Photos of a new, sprawling Amazon warehouse in Mexico surrounded by deteriorating shacks have gone viral as the tech giant continues to expand its footprint internationally

09/08/2021

Source: Business Insider

A sprawling new Amazon fulfillment center in Tijuana, Mexico, is surrounded by deteriorating housing.

The photographer Omar Martinez captured images of the warehouse, which show a stark contrast between Amazon’s crisp, white facility and the crumbling shacks around it. They were shared widely and discussed on Reddit and Twitter.

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Film trailer touches a nerve as Mexico grapples with race and class

10/15/2020

Source: The Gaurdian

The scene is a society wedding in Mexico, where smartly dressed guests are toasting the newlyweds in the grounds of a luxury home. But the celebration is interrupted by a group of interlopers, and the scene quickly descends into violence and terror.

The dystopian tone continues throughout the two-minute clip promoting the movie New Order, which depicts the imposition of military rule in Mexico after a bloody uprising by the country’s underclass.

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Mexican president voices regret on growth, but says economy fairer

amlo

12/03/19 – Reuters

By Dave Graham

Mexico’s president conceded on Sunday that economic growth has fallen short of his expectations, but said that wealth is now more fairly distributed as he celebrated a year in office riding high in opinion polls, in defiance of mounting problems.

A year ago, veteran leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador assumed the presidency pledging to raise economic growth to 4% per year. Instead, the economy has stagnated and slipped into a mild recession during the first half of the year.

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Reality show about the wealthy triggers backlash in Mexico

08/29/18 Washington Post

Image result for made in mexico netflixPhoto: Netflix

A new Netflix reality series following the lavish lives of nine wealthy, light-skinned socialites in Mexico City has provoked a backlash from critics who say it’s tone-deaf in a country where most have darker skin and about half the population lives in poverty.

“Trash,” ‘’filth,” ‘’pathetic,” ‘’classist,” were some of the more polite adjectives Twitter users employed to describe their reaction to the show, “Made in Mexico.”

Critics are also questioning the timing of the streaming service’s first Mexican reality show, announced a little over a month after the country overwhelmingly elected as president the leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who rails against what he calls an entrenched and corrupt elite and promises to make the poor his top priority.

“In the last elections we showed that we live in a democratic country. Nonetheless, we still suffer terrible atavisms related to classism and, what’s worse, racism,” said Guadalupe Loaeza, who has written several books about the Mexican elite. “More than money, the color of one’s skin is definitive … for whether one is accepted or not among the ‘rich boys and girls.’”

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EVENT TOMORROW! Inequality in Mexico

social classWHEN: TOMORROW, July 7, 9:00-11:00am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s economic inequality has inhibited the country’s economic growth and slowed the potential of its social and human capital. And extreme inequality has worsened over the last 20 years, with economic elites capturing most of the benefits of growth. The political and economic implications are huge.

Oxfam Mexico recently issued a study on Mexico’s inequality and its policy implications, and the study’s findings will be presented and discussed at this forum on July 7, 9-11am. The study was authored by Gerardo Esquivel, professor and researcher at the Center for Economic Studies in the Colegio de Mexico.

Speakers

Ricardo Fuentes-Nieva
Executive Director, Oxfam Mexico

Marjorie Wood
Senior Associate, Institute for Policy Studies and Managing Editor, Inequality.org

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

UPCOMING EVENT! Inequality in Mexico

social classWHEN: Tuesday, July 7, 9:00-11:00am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s economic inequality has inhibited the country’s economic growth and slowed the potential of its social and human capital. And extreme inequality has worsened over the last 20 years, with economic elites capturing most of the benefits of growth. The political and economic implications are huge.

Oxfam Mexico recently issued a study on Mexico’s inequality and its policy implications, and the study’s findings will be presented and discussed at this forum on July 7, 9-11am. The study was authored by Gerardo Esquivel, professor and researcher at the Center for Economic Studies in the Colegio de Mexico.

Speakers

Ricardo Fuentes-Nieva
Executive Director, Oxfam Mexico

Marjorie Wood
Senior Staff Member, Global Economy Project, Institute for Policy Studies

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s Extreme Inequality: 1% Owns Half of Country’s Wealth

6/25/15 teleSUR

Photo by Flickr user Aleiex
Photo by Flickr user Aleiex

Extreme inequality has increased in Mexico while the economy has stagnated, concentrating almost half of the country’s wealth in the hands of its elite 1 percent, according to a new Oxfam report. According to the report, the wealth of the Mexico’s 16 billionaires multiplies five fold each year, while the country’s GDP increases by less than 1 percent annually. Mexico is among the top 14 richest countries in the world by GDP, yet over half its population, or 53 million people, live in poverty.

The report states that one of the most serious aspects of inequality is unbalanced income distribution, which is becoming more pronounced. Mexico’s telecommunications tycoon Carlos Slim is the second richest person in the world. His estimated 5 percent return on wealth alone could cover the cost of some 2 million low wage workers at the minimum wage rate of US$4.50 per day. The wealth of Slim and just three fellow Mexican billionaires account for 9 percent of the country’s GDP, equivalent to the income of nearly 20 million Mexicans on the other side of the inequality equation.

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Connections Matter in Mexico’s Northern Border Region

08/20/14 Huffington Post. By Indre Biskis

Monterrey-Nathaniel C. SheetzMonterrey, Mexico is a city split by a large river, but that is not the only divide. Deep economic and social gaps separate rich from poor, educated from uneducated, legal from illegal. The population was further split when a highway was constructed right through its city center, solidifying the already significant schism.

Monterrey, the capital of the Nuevo Leon region, is a business-industrial city with a population over 1 million. In 2005, it was ranked as the safest city in Latin America and Mexico. However, since 2008, the city started experiencing violence related to turf battles between warring drug cartels, degrading a city with great economic potential to one full of fear. Drug use and high murder rates continue to steal the lives of youth, tempting those who lack the skills for traditional jobs into much higher-paying, high-risk careers of narcotics and crime.

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Mexico shocked as pregnant indigenous woman gives birth on lawn after clinic refuses entry

Baby feet by Flikr user sabianmaggyThe Washington Post, 10/09/2013

An indigenous woman squats in pain after giving birth, her newborn still bound by the umbilical cord and lying on the ground. It’s a photograph that horrified Mexicans because of where it took place: the lawn outside a medical clinic where the woman had been denied help, and it struck a nerve in a country where inequity is still pervasive.

The government of the southern state of Oaxaca announced Wednesday that it has suspended the health center’s director, Dr. Adrian Cruz, while officials conduct state and federal investigations into the Oct. 2 incident.

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Mexico poverty rate eased to 45.5 percent: development agency

poorReuters, 7/29/2013

Mexico’s poverty rate fell slightly between 2010 and 2012, dropping 0.6 percent to 53.3 million people, although half a million more people entered the ranks of the poor, the government’s social development agency Coneval said on Monday.

The data covers the final two years of former President Felipe Calderon’s administration, in which poverty increased to 45.5 percent of the population in 2012 from 42.6 percent at the end of 2006. Coneval’s findings dent Calderon’s record and underline the challenges new President Enrique Pena Nieto faces in his vow to lift 15 million people out of poverty, bring jobs to the country’s poorest areas and unlock Mexico’s economic potential.

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