Why some say Mexico already built Trump’s wall — and paid for it

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10/21/19 – CNN News

By Catherine E. Shoichet and Natalie Gallón

The commander paces in front of a line of troops, preparing them for the day’s mission.
“We are in our country. We are in Mexico. We are enforcing our laws,” he says, his voice getting louder with each point he makes.
“Nobody is going to come here to trample on our laws,” he continues. “Nobody is going come here to trample on our country, on our land.”

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Democrats’ 2020 policy blitz largely lacking on immigration

5/30/2019 – Associated Press

By Will Weissert

immigrationDemocratic presidential contenders are in a feverish battle to one-up each other with ever-more-ambitious plans to beat back global warming , curb gun violence , offer universal health care coverage , slash student debt and preserve abortion rights . Largely left out of the policy parade: immigration.

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‘The US can’t dump people in Mexico’: Trump asylum policy in doubt

1/5/2019 – The Guardian

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When she announced last month that tens of thousands of asylum seekers would be returned to Mexico while their cases are considered, the homeland security secretary, Kirstjen Nielsen, described the move as a “historic” overhaul of US immigration policy.

But more than two weeks later, the new strategy has yet to begin and it remains unclear how the plan would work – or even if Mexico is willing to enforce it.

The measure would be the Trump administration’s most significant move so far to dissuade people from seeking asylum. It would relieve pressure on US immigration authorities – and transfer it to Mexico.

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What the 2018 election means for immigrants in the U.S.

10/26/2018 – Washington Post

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Photo by Aaron Kittredge on Pexels.com

Recent events at the U.S.-Mexico border and ongoing deliberations over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program have put in stark light the perils of belonging to a politicized group. Even immigrants who have risked their life in defense of their adopted country have found that service is no protection in our nativist climate.

This year, Army veteran Miguel Perez Jr., who enlisted after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, was deported because of substance abuse issues connected to his struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder — a direct result of his military service. Other veterans with precarious immigration statuses face similar predicaments, caught between President Trump and his nativist platform and Democrats who wish to widen immigrant rights and protect members of vulnerable groups such as Perez. The midterm elections are likely to determine their fate.

In the late 19th century, a class of Union veterans faced similar political struggles. Public concern grew as reports surfaced that thousands of Union veterans were emigrating out of the United States but keeping their military pensions. Many felt as if these veterans had forfeited their right to American aid by leaving the United States. This belief turned these veterans into a political football — much like immigrants today.

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Arrests of migrant families at U.S.-Mexico border increase: data

10/23/2018 – Reuters

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REUTERS/Carlos Barria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. agents arrested nearly 17,000 members of family units attempting to cross the U.S. border with Mexico in September, a 31 percent increase over the previous month, according to official statistics released on Tuesday.

In a news briefing with reporters on Tuesday, Trump administration officials pointed to the increase in migrant families as evidence of a “border crisis” because those groups are more difficult for immigration enforcement officials to detain and deport because of protections granted by U.S. law to migrant children.

President Donald Trump’s administration has expressed alarm at the change in the makeup of migrants attempting to cross into the United States from mostly single adults to children and families traveling together.

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Publicity, transport, food: migrants flock to more caravans after Trump broadsides

10/23/2018 – Reuters

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REUTERS/Luis Echeverria

TAPACHULA, Mexico (Reuters) – For years, an annual caravan of Central American migrants traveling through Mexico to the U.S. border received modest publicity until President Donald Trump condemned it in April, pitching the procession into the glare of the world’s media – and into the homes of thousands of potential migrants.

Though only a fraction of the 1,500 migrants made it to the United States, coverage of their trek in vehicles and on foot inspired many considering the journey to see caravans as a safer way to travel than the perilous trip many had for years undertaken alone, dozens of migrants told Reuters.

“It was a real success,” 20-year-old Honduran Antonio Perreira said of the impact of April’s caravan, as he rested with 14 friends on the way to Mexico.

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Borderline Navigating the invisible boundary and physical barriers that define the U.S.-Mexico border

10/17/2018 – The Washington Post

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Photo by izhar khan on Pexels.com

In 1989, the first fence built to stop illegal crossings from Mexico to the United States was erected in San Diego, where the border begins. From here, the border stretches for almost 2,000 miles, only 700 of which are walled or fenced. President Trump wants to change that.

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That first fence was a line of surplus helicopter landing pads, welded together. It stopped vehicles but not climbers, so a taller secondary layer came in 1996. Then came a third layer, including at Friendship Park, the one place where families not permitted to travel between the countries can gather to talk through mesh.

Nearly six miles east of Friendship Park is the port of entry at San Ysidro, which is the most heavily traveled in the Western Hemisphere; 135,000 people cross there each day.

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Congress Set to Fund Government, but Not Trump’s Wall

9/24/2018 – New York Times

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AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

WASHINGTON — Congress is set to pass a crucial spending bill that averts a government shutdown, but there’s one potential obstacle: President Donald Trump.

Neither party wants the government to close ahead of the midterm elections that will determine control of Congress, but Trump has made clear his frustration at the lack of money for his long-promised wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. He says it is “ridiculous” the wall has yet to be fully funded.

With less than a week before a Sept. 30 deadline for a partial shutdown, Republican leaders hope they can get Trump to set aside his frustration about the wall and sign legislation that funds the military and a host of civilian agencies for the next year. The bill also would provide a short-term fix to keep the government running through Dec. 7.

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Trump Administration Wants to Detain Migrant Children Longer

9/6/2018 – Wall Street Journal

Immigrant children housed in a tent encampment near the Mexican border in Tornillo, Texas, in June.         

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Photo: Mike Blake/Reuters

The Trump administration said it wants to effectively end a decades-old legal settlement that bars long-term detention for immigrant children when families are arrested for trying to enter the U.S. illegally.

Department of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services officials said Thursday that they want to circumvent the so-called Flores agreement, a 1997 court settlement that prevents authorities from detaining children for more than 20 days.

The proposal, announced as a rule change in the Federal Register, signals that officials are looking for ways to detain families together until their immigration cases are decided amid the administration’s efforts to crack down on illegal border-crossers.

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Killing of Mollie Tibbetts in Iowa Inflames Immigration Debate

08/22/18 New York Times

Charlie Neibergall/Associated Press

Television cameras had for weeks swarmed this small town in Iowa farm country as the police looked for Mollie Tibbetts, the college student who went for a jog last month and never returned home.

After hundreds of tips and interviews, and after countless prayer vigils and donations to a reward fund, investigators got a tragic break in their case on Tuesday. A body believed to be Ms. Tibbetts’s was found buried beneath cornstalks on a farm outside town. The authorities charged Cristhian Rivera, who they said is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, with first-degree murder in her death.

President Trump and other conservatives quickly cited the arrest of Mr. Rivera, who worked on a farm owned by a prominent Republican family, as proof of the flawed immigration system and lax border security the president has long warned about.

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