Americans’ views of immigrants marked by widening partisan, generational divides

4/15/2016 Pew Research Center

Pew_Research_Center_logoRepublicans and Democrats continue to disagree deeply over immigration policies, including how to deal with undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. and whether to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Underlying these differences is a substantial – and growing – partisan divide over whether immigrants generally are a strength or burden on the country.

Read more…

Border apprehensions, views of immigrants, 10 demographic trends

pew hispanic trends

April 15, 2016

Apprehensions of Mexican migrants at U.S. borders reach near-historic low

The number of Mexican migrants apprehended at U.S. borders in fiscal 2015 dropped to the lowest levels in nearly 50 years. This change comes after a period in which net migration of Mexicans to the U.S. had fallen to lows not seen since the 1940s. READ MORE >

Americans’ views of immigrants marked by widening partisan, generational divides

Republicans and Democrats continue to disagree deeply over immigration policies, including how to deal with undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. and whether to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Underlying these differences is a substantial – and growing – partisan divide over whether immigrants generally are a strength or burden on the country. READ MORE >

10 demographic trends that are shaping the U.S. and the world

Americans are more racially and ethnically diverse than in the past, and the U.S. is projected to be even more diverse in the coming decades. These demographic changes are shifting the electorate – and American politics. The 2016 electorate will be the most diverse in U.S. history due to strong growth among Hispanic eligible voters, particularly U.S.-born youth.
READ MORE >
Demographic research: From multiracial children to gender identity, what demographers are studying now

Latinos in the 2016 Election: State Fact Sheets

The state fact sheets contain data on the size and social and economic characteristics of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic eligible voter populations. READ MORE >

April 19 primary: New York
April 19 primary: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island

Now or never: Trump’s Mexico wall threat encourages migration to US

4/5/2016 The Guardian

mexican immigrantCatalina Maldonado wanted to flee El Salvador for the US to protect her son from danger. After learning of Donald Trump’s plan to build a wall along the border with Mexico, she decided it was now or maybe never.

If the Republican candidate’s supporters might be delighted that some in Central America are treating the prospect of a wall-raising President Trump with high seriousness, in the short term it appears his rhetoric may be encouraging – not dissuading – migrants to head north to escape poverty and violence.

“We heard he wants to build those walls. That’s why we came,” Maldonado said. “A lot of people are talking about it in El Salvador. They say really bad things about him,” the 34-year-old added through a translator in a shelter in Texas’s Rio Grande valley, the centre of the 2014 surge in unauthorized crossings by families and unaccompanied minors and still the busiest route.

More than half of the lone children and families caught crossing the south-west border this fiscal year have been apprehended in the area, which offers the shortest journey from Central America, has sizable populations on both sides of the frontier, flat terrain and dense scrubland and where the only barrier between the US and Mexico is natural: the narrow, serpentine Rio Grande river.

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How Mexican immigrants ended ‘separate but equal’ in California

3/2/2016 Los Angeles Times

In the coverage of the 2016 election cycle, you’ll hear this time and again: Latinos — immigrants and their families — are playing an important role in electing the next U.S. president. They are the largest minority group in the nation, and they are poised to make a major impact on American democracy.

It won’t be the first time. Seventy years ago, Mexican immigrants moved American civil rights forward, away from racial segregation toward integration and equality. It happened eight years before the Supreme Court began to dismantle segregation by handing down its decision in Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954.

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Women Journey to Mexico to Put Focus on Immigration during Pope Visit

2/17/16 NBC News

Border fence by couchlearnerFor Guillermina Castellanos, the Pope’s message on compassion for immigrants is personal. Though she and her nine children are U.S. citizens, the California resident said her husband has been living in the U.S. for about 20 years and has not been able to legalize his status. Every time her daughters see a police officer drive up behind them, they’re afraid that their father will get pulled over and get arrested for being undocumented.

I tell them, ‘Don’t be afraid. The cop won’t do anything to your dad,'” Castellanos said. “But they still live with that constant fear.”

The Pope’s trip to the city of Juárez, Mexico on Wednesday is drawing hundreds of thousands of faithful on both sides of the border. But as the eyes of the world descend on the Pontiff’s visit to the area, some U.S. families like Castellanos say they want to ensure that people focus on the Pope’s message of compassion and dignity for immigrants.

Read more… 

Young returnees start over in Mexico after growing up in the U.S.

1/6/2016 PBS News Hour

Even before recent raids by the Department of Homeland Security, hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants have been deported annually. And those who grew up in the U.S. have found themselves living in what feels like a foreign country. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro talks to some young people who are starting over and feeling culture shock after having to leave the U.S.

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EVENT MONDAY | Latinos in America: From Immigrants to Citizens

jklWHEN: Monday, October 26, 3:00-4:00pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Latinos are one of the fastest growing minorities in American society. But who or what is a Latino? Many are recent arrivals and they are making the transition from immigrants to citizens. But how fast are they integrating, what are their political views, and how will they affect American politics in coming decades? The Latino Center for Leadership Development in Dallas, the Tower Center at SMU, and the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute are seeking to answer these and other questions, looking at the socio-demographic profile of Latinos, the dilemmas of civic and political integration, and the hurdles that Latinos face in their quest to become full citizens.

Speakers

Michael Jones-Correa
Former Wilson Center Fellow

Miryam Hazan
Consultant, Inter-American Development Bank

Andrew Selee
Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Miguel Esteban Solis
President, Latino Center for Leadership Development

Tom K. Wong
Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego

Click to RSVP.