EVENT MONDAY | Latinos in America: From Immigrants to Citizens

jklWHEN: Monday, October 26, 3:00-4:00pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Latinos are one of the fastest growing minorities in American society. But who or what is a Latino? Many are recent arrivals and they are making the transition from immigrants to citizens. But how fast are they integrating, what are their political views, and how will they affect American politics in coming decades? The Latino Center for Leadership Development in Dallas, the Tower Center at SMU, and the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute are seeking to answer these and other questions, looking at the socio-demographic profile of Latinos, the dilemmas of civic and political integration, and the hurdles that Latinos face in their quest to become full citizens.


Michael Jones-Correa
Former Wilson Center Fellow

Miryam Hazan
Consultant, Inter-American Development Bank

Andrew Selee
Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Miguel Esteban Solis
President, Latino Center for Leadership Development

Tom K. Wong
Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego

Click to RSVP.

Immigrant Employment and Earnings Growth in Canada and the U.S.: Evidence from Longitudinal Data

New Report from The National Bureau of Economic Research

By Neeraj Kaushal, Yao Lu, Nicole Denier, Julia Shu-Huah Wang, Stephen J. Trejo
September 2015

In this new report, the authors study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the U.S. using nationally representative longitudinal data sets covering 1996-2008. Models with person fixed effects show that on average immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the U.S., on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to U.S. born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the U.S. than in Canada. The authors further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier arrivals, presumably reflecting selective return migration.

Click here to access the study. 

Tracing The Shifting Meaning Of ‘Alien’

822/15 NPR

Immigration_and_Customs_Enforcement_SWATRepublican presidential candidate Donald Trump repeatedly referred to “criminal aliens” and “illegal aliens” in the immigration plan he released on Sunday. “Alien,” and especially “illegal alien,” have become such staples in the vocabulary of conservative pundits and politicians that many immigrant rights advocates now reject those terms as derogatory and dehumanizing.

But it wasn’t always like that.

Take this excerpt from a letter that a group of Mexican-American law students wrote to the editor of the Los Angeles Times in 1970. They sent it after the paper ran an editorial with a headline that included the term “wetback.”

“We are still faced with insensitive and racist terms, such as wetback, to refer to Mexican nationals who have entered the country illegally,” the students wrote, “and we are now educating the public to use terms like illegal aliens or illegal entrants.”

Read more…

Experts: Trump’s Border Wall Could Be Costly, Ineffective

8/19/2015 News Channel 9

Via Flickr user "Gage Skidmore"
Via Flickr user “Gage Skidmore”

Donald Trump, the current frontrunner for the Republican 2016 presidential nomination, released his first policy paper over the weekend, proposing ‘immigration reform that will make America great again.’

Trump has faced criticism for negative comments about illegal immigrants, but he has remained at the top of the Republican field in the polls and some of his opponents vying for the party’s nomination have adopted hardline positions on the issue similar to his.

One of the central tenets of Trump’s immigration policy is a wall across the U.S/Mexico border—’A nation without borders is not a nation,’ he states in his policy paper—but immigration experts question the effectiveness and cost of such a venture.

US: First Step to End Family Immigration Detention

6/25/15 Human Rights Watch

Army detentions MichoacanThe United States Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) decision to scale back its use of family immigration detention could help thousands of children and mothers who are fleeing persecution, Human Rights Watch said today. DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson announced on June 24, 2015, that the Obama administration was committed to “substantial changes” to family immigration detention.

The greatest benefit would be for families who are seeking asylum in the US, Human Rights Watch said. Johnson said that “once a family has established eligibility for asylum or other relief under our laws, long-term detention is an inefficient use of our resources and should be discontinued.”

Read more…

Laredo Border Patrol saw busy weekend

6/22/15 KGNS TV

CBP_Border_Patrol_agent_reads_the_Miranda_rights_U.S. Border Patrol agents from the Laredo Sector significantly disrupted criminal organization activities over the weekend as they rescued illegal immigrants, detained subject with a criminal sexual crime, and made a significant narcotic seizure.

On June 19, at approximately 11:00PM, Laredo North Station agents assigned to the Border Patrol checkpoint located on Interstate Highway 35, rescued 37 illegal immigrants concealed inside a tractor-trailer. The driver was referred to secondary inspection where the agents discovered the undocumented immigrants in the unventilated cargo area. All of the undocumented immigrants were from Mexico.

Read more…

Feds arrest 280 immigrants, including 36 in Kansas

6/18/15 Washington Times

hands in handcuffsAuthorities say they have arrested 280 convicted criminals for deportation in six Midwest states, including Kansas, during a monthlong enforcement surge.

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in a news release Wednesday that of those arrested, 35 men and one woman were found in Kansas. Thirty of the immigrants came from Mexico, and six came from Guatemala. The agency says the immigrants arrested fall within its priorities for deportation. They had previous convictions for armed robbery, drug trafficking, drunken driving and other crimes.
Read more…