UPCOMING EVENT | Soaring Homicide Rates in Mexico: Understanding the Crisis and Proposing Solutions

pexels-photo-54512.jpegWHEN: Monday, May 7, 2018, 9:00-11:00am

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center

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It is no surprise that crime, insecurity, and corruption are top issues in this year’s presidential campaign. Last year set a modern day record for homicides in Mexico – over 29,000. Why are homicides soaring in Mexico once again and, more importantly, what are the prospects for the future? Are there any new ideas for reducing homicides and increasing security in Mexico? What are Mexico’s presidential candidates proposing?

Join us for a discussion with leading experts on crime, violence, and security in Mexico.

Speakers
Dr. David Shirk

Global Fellow, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
Director, Master’s Program in International Relations & Associate Professor, Political Science and International Relations, University of San Diego
Director, Justice in Mexico

Dr. Rafael Fernández de Castro
Director, Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, University of California San Diego
Advisory Board Member, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Edna Jaime Treviño
Director General, México Evalúa

Dr. Cecilia Farfán-Méndez
Postdoctoral Fellow, International Relations, Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, University of California San Diego

Moderator
Eric L. Olson
Senior Advisor, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center
Deputy Director, Latin American Program, Wilson Center

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UPCOMING EVENT | The State of Security in Mexico

security_lockWHEN: Friday, February 3, 8:45am-1:00pm

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Wilson Center, Washington, DC

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Homicides appear to have increased significantly in parts of Mexico during 2016. By one calculation, organized crime related homicides increased roughly 49 percent between 2015 and 2016. October was the most violent month in nearly four years, and after two years of decline, 2016 roughly matched the homicide rate for 2013. Moreover, major cities like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez that had experienced a decrease in homocides since 2012 saw a significant uptick. What is driving this troubling tren and what kinds of innovative programs are being implemented to reduce violence or prevent it altogether? Please join our panel of experts for a discussion about these and other questions.

Welcome

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

The Current State of U.S. Mexico Security Cooperation and Future Prospects 

Eric L. Olson, Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute for Security Policy and Associate Director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Panel I: What is Driving the Increase in Homicides in Mexico

Moderator: Clare Seelke, Specialist in Latin American Affairs, Congressional Research Service

Overview: David Shirk, Professor & Director, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

The Case of Tijuana: Octavio Rodriguez, Program Coordinator, Justice in Mexico Project, University of San Diego

The Case of Tamaulipas: Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley & Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Case of Ciudad Juarez: Alfredo Corchado, Journalist

The Case of Guerrero, Chris Kyle, Professor of Anthropology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Panel II: Promising Experiences in Violence Reduction

Moderator: Eric L. Olson, Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute for Security Policy and Associate Director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program

Is violence reduction possible?  What’s the evidence? : Enrique Betancourt, Director of Violence and Crime Prevention Initiative, Chemonics International

A Public Health Approach to Reducing Violence: Brent Decker, Chief Program Officer, Cure Violence

Building Community Resilience Through Investing in Young Leaders: Carlos Cruz, Founder, Cauce Ciudadano, A.C

Reintegration of Young People in Conflict with the Law: Mercedes Castañeda Gomez Mont,  Director of Youth Program & Co-Founder, Reinserta Un Mexicano, A.C

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Over Half of Mexico Homicides Perpetrated by Organized Crime: Report

gun - crime scene10/27/16 InSight Crime

A study linking a percentage of Mexico‘s homicides to organized crime offers a different view of the rising violence depicted through government homicide figures, which do not discriminate between all killings and those related to criminal groups.

From January to September 2016, organized crime was responsible for 8,815 homicides, which amounts to 58 percent of all homicides during that period and a 47 percent increase in comparison to the same period the previous year, according to the study by Semáforo Delictivo and Lantia Consultores. The data was obtained through the monitoring of media reports, according to Animal Politico, and comparing the killing count with official homicide statistics.

Read more…

Surge in Tijuana Violence Recalls Past Bloodshed

10/19/16 InSight Crime

Pedestrian_border_crossing_sign_Tijuana_Mexico
By Toksave

Tijuana’s murder rate has spiked dramatically in recent months, leaving officials searching for reasons and responses to an emerging security crisis in Mexico‘s northern border city.

As reported by the San Diego Union-Tribune and other outlets, 2016 has been more violent than any recent year for the Baja California border city. Through the first nine months of the year, authorities had registered 636 murders. This puts it on a pace for 848 murders in the whole of the year, which, according to the Tribune’s statistics, would narrowly break the 2010 record of 844, the most violent year in recent memory.

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Organized Crime Dominates in Mexico’s Most Violent Cities

10/03/16 InSight Crime

crime and drugsMany of Mexico’s most violent cities are home to competing criminal groups and drug-fueled conflicts, a clear sign of how organized crime is contributing to the country’s worsening security situation.

The seven most violent cities in Mexico with a population of more than 100,000 are all in the states of either Colima or Guerrero, according to official figures collated by Animal Politico. Both of these states currently serve as battlegrounds between rival cartels.

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Drug-Kingpin Takedowns Spur Turf Wars as Murders Surge in Mexico

08/17/16 Bloomberg

crime and drugsThree years after Mexicans elected President Enrique Pena Nieto on a pledge of putting an end to the murder and violence gripping the nation, killings have returned to the dark days of his predecessor’s administration.

Homicides rose 15 percent to 9,400 in the first half from a year earlier, the government said in July, reaching levels of former President Felipe Calderon’s term. But drug-related killings have soared even more according to one tally: Milenio newspaper, which has tracked organized-crime deaths since 2006, reports a 33 percent surge through July.

Read more…

Five Security Priorities for Mexico

1/27/2016 Viridiana Rios, The Expert Take

expert I (2)The Mexico Institute of The Wilson Center gathered a group of academics and experts on security issues, to discuss how Mexico’s security panorama has changed over the last year. The consensus is clear: Mexico’s violence issues are reviving. 

Homicides in Mexico increased by 11% during the last year, reversing the decline in violent crime that had started in 2012 (SNSP 2016). Mexico finished 2015 having about 46 homicides per day, 4 more than the 42 homicides per day that the country had in 2014. To put this number in perspective, from 2012 to 2014, on average, the total number of homicides has declined by about 2,400 every year, but in 2015 it increased by 1,360.

It is time for Mexico to take action. The last time that Mexico saw its homicide rate begin to tick up, rising from a low point in 2007, it took just three years for homicides to double (SNSP 2016). From 2007 to 2010, homicides increased from 10,253 to 20,680 in Mexico as a result of the fracture of large drug trafficking organizations into smaller rival ones. Mexico has still not fully recovered from such a spike in violence. The country is still 66% more violent than it was in 2007.

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