Designing babies or saving lives in Mexico?

9/29/16 BBC News

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The headlines earlier this week that a baby had been born using DNA from three people got the world very excited – no more so than in Mexico, where the technique was carried out.

The US team at New Hope Fertility Clinic in New York, led by Dr John Zhang, had to travel to their Mexico clinic in Guadalajara to carry out the procedure, which is effectively banned in the United States. Dr Alejandro Chavez-Badiola heads up the Mexico clinic and worked with Dr Zhang on the procedure. He says the procedure has been misrepresented in the media since the story broke.

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EVENT TOMORROW | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tomorrow, September 27, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00 PM

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP

UPCOMING EVENT | Mexico Public Health Forum 2016

medicine healthcare - stethoscopeWHEN: Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 2:00-4:00pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click to RSVP.

As Mexico’s demographic profile and economy change over time, the country is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, from an ageing population to the rise of non-communicable diseases. In fact, the country now faces a “double burden” of disease: while policy-makers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. This combination of problems causes both bifurcation and extra costs for public health policy.

The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto has taken a varied approach to health policy thus far. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending. In isolated areas, such as obesity, the government has sought to use fiscal policy to address the problem, but has failed to adopt a more comprehensive and consolidated strategy.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our Mexico Public Health Forum 2016 to discuss the current state of public health policy, offering an overview of the health care system and its challenges.

Welcome & Introduction
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Address
Pablo Kuri Morales
Mexican Undersecretary of Health Prevention and Promotion

An Overview of Mexico’s Public Health Challenges
Andrew Rudman
Managing Director, ManattJones Global Strategies

Amy Glover
Director – Mexico Practice, McLarty Associates

Catherine Mellor
Executive Director, Global Health Initiative, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Click to RSVP.

PepsiCo, Coca-Cola still sparkle in Mexico after fizzy drinks tax

07/07/16 CNBC

Coca Cola BottlesFlat beverages are helping overall sales at Coca-Cola Co and PepsiCo Inc stay fizzy in Mexico despite a tax on sodas.

As Mexico moved toward implementing a soda tax to combat soaring rates of obesity and diabetes three years ago, the beverage industry fought back hard, warning that sales in the world’s No. 2 consumer of sugary drinks could take a hit.

But more than two years later, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have found ways to prosper in Mexico thanks to alternative beverages and resilient demand, a Reuters review of corporate filings and executive comments shows.

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Study: Mexico’s Junk-Food Tax Cut Purchases by 5.1 Percent

07/05/2016 The New York Times

chatarraMEXICO CITY — Mexico’s 8 percent tax on high-calorie snacks has been successful in reducing junk food purchases, but only by a small amount and only among poor and middle-class households, a study said Tuesday.

The report published in the online journal PLOS-Medicine showed an average reduction of 5.1 percent in purchases of items subject to the tax, which was implemented in 2014. The reduction equaled only about 25 grams (0.88 ounces) per month per person.

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Mexico says 11 pregnant women infected with Zika

3/1/16 Reuters

Mexico has confirmed 11 pregnant women are infected with the Zika virus, out of a total of 121 cases, the government said on Monday.

Most of the cases were identified in the southern Mexican states of Chiapas and Oaxaca, according to a health ministry report.

Eight of the pregnant women are from Chiapas, two are from Oaxaca, and one is from the Gulf coast state of Veracruz, the health ministry reported.

The number of cases of infected pregnant women has risen since mid-February, when the health ministry said there were 80 confirmed cases of Zika, including six cases of pregnant women with the virus.

Much remains unknown about Zika, including whether the virus actually causes microcephaly, a condition marked by unusually small heads that can result in developmental problems.

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