PepsiCo, Coca-Cola still sparkle in Mexico after fizzy drinks tax

07/07/16 CNBC

Coca Cola BottlesFlat beverages are helping overall sales at Coca-Cola Co and PepsiCo Inc stay fizzy in Mexico despite a tax on sodas.

As Mexico moved toward implementing a soda tax to combat soaring rates of obesity and diabetes three years ago, the beverage industry fought back hard, warning that sales in the world’s No. 2 consumer of sugary drinks could take a hit.

But more than two years later, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have found ways to prosper in Mexico thanks to alternative beverages and resilient demand, a Reuters review of corporate filings and executive comments shows.

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Study: Mexico’s Junk-Food Tax Cut Purchases by 5.1 Percent

07/05/2016 The New York Times

chatarraMEXICO CITY — Mexico’s 8 percent tax on high-calorie snacks has been successful in reducing junk food purchases, but only by a small amount and only among poor and middle-class households, a study said Tuesday.

The report published in the online journal PLOS-Medicine showed an average reduction of 5.1 percent in purchases of items subject to the tax, which was implemented in 2014. The reduction equaled only about 25 grams (0.88 ounces) per month per person.

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Mexico says 11 pregnant women infected with Zika

3/1/16 Reuters

Mexico has confirmed 11 pregnant women are infected with the Zika virus, out of a total of 121 cases, the government said on Monday.

Most of the cases were identified in the southern Mexican states of Chiapas and Oaxaca, according to a health ministry report.

Eight of the pregnant women are from Chiapas, two are from Oaxaca, and one is from the Gulf coast state of Veracruz, the health ministry reported.

The number of cases of infected pregnant women has risen since mid-February, when the health ministry said there were 80 confirmed cases of Zika, including six cases of pregnant women with the virus.

Much remains unknown about Zika, including whether the virus actually causes microcephaly, a condition marked by unusually small heads that can result in developmental problems.

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Mexico Names New Heads of Pemex, Health, Social Security

2/8/2016 ABC News

120px-PemexA U.S.-educated economist took up the reins of state oil company Petroleos Mexicanos in one of several Cabinet changes announced Monday by President Enrique Pena Nieto.

Jose Antonio Gonzalez Anaya was sworn in as head of the oil company better known as Pemex, which has been hit hard by the plunge in global crude prices as Mexico embarks on an ambitious overhaul of its energy sector.

He replaced Emilio Lozoya, who had been at the post since 2012. Lozoya’s tenure was marked by an explosion at Pemex headquarters that killed 37 people in January 2013, shortly after he took office, and rising fuel thefts from Pemex pipelines.

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EVENT TOMORROW | Innovation in Colonias on the Texas-Mexico Border: Building on Border Assets

man_w_social_media_0WHEN: TOMORROW, Tuesday, October 27, 9:00-11:00am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Laboratory and Mexico Institute, along with the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, are pleased to invite you to the event, Innovation in Colonias on the Texas-Mexico Border: Building on Border Assets.” While public discussion often focuses on the challenges facing low-income communities living on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, the region’s assets can be leveraged to advance local economic development. A panel of experts will discuss opportunities to promote  development, entrepreneurship and job creation for the colonia populations living along the border. Panelists will discuss how policies for affordable housing, infrastructure, education, workforce development, entrepreneurship, and health can be integrated with efforts to build an inclusive economy and strong community networks and cooperation. On-the-ground innovation in the border region and in the colonias offers important new models for development in underserved communities.

A recent report by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, “Las Colonias in the 21st Century: Progress Along the Texas-Mexico Border”, provides context for the discussion. Texas colonias, home to an estimated 500,000 people, represent one of the largest concentrations of poverty in the U.S. This report offers a comprehensive profile of Texas border colonias, assessing the opportunities, successes, and challenges facing these communities.

Click here to RSVP. 

Mexico City | Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference 2015

The Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference  took place in Mexico City from October 18-21, allowing important conversations about women’s health to take place. The conference provided a forum to identify, understand, and respond to the most urgent health needs of mothers and newborns.

Sandeep Bathala, Senior Program Associate for the Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program & Maternal Health Initiative, attended the conference in Mexico City. Below are four blog posts she wrote based on what she learned.

1.) Previewing the Next Generation of Global Maternal and Newborn Health Programs in Mexico City

2.) Better Training and Support for Midwives Is Saving Women’s Lives

3.) Iatrogenic Fistula on the Rise as More Women Gain Access to Surgery

4.) In India, Lower Castes and Tribals Being Left Behind in Maternal Health

Mexico’s Soda Tax Is Working. The US Should Learn From It

07/13/15 Wired

sugarLast fall, Berkeley, California, became the first city in the United States to pass a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages—soda pop, sweetened teas, sugary juices, and energy drinks. Proponents say the tax will discourage the consumption of a nutrition-free, even dangerous category of beverage. Critics counter with claims of an over-reaching nanny state whose interventions will do nothing to curb rates of obesity and diabetes.

To figure out who’s right, it’d be nice to have some data. But before Berkeley passed its tax, 30 other cities and states across the US had tried to introduce similar measures and failed. Berkeley’s tax is certainly raising revenues, but it’s too soon to know whether consumption has gone down or overall public health has improved. Luckily, somewhere else has a year’s head start on taxing soda: Mexico.

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