Why is Mexico Suing U.S. Gunmakers

08/24/2021

Source: The New York Times

For years, Mexico has been gripped by horrific violence as drug cartels battle each other and kill civilians. In the last 15 years alone, homicides have tripled.

The violence, the Mexican government says, is fueled, in part, by American guns, and the nation’s lax gun control laws.

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‘Not normal’: Big flow of U.S. arms to Mexico ‘can’t be denied,’ author says

8/18/2021

Source: NBC News

In the last four years, Ioan Grillo traveled thousands of kilometers in crossings that took him from Mexico to the United States, Germany, Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and Colombia, while following a trail of iron and blood. Beyond the multimillion-dollar figures and chilling statistics, the writer was looking for answers to an ethical dilemma.

Grillo asked an arms dealer in Bulgaria, “Are you worried that the weapons you sell, legally, may later fall into the hands of criminals or terrorists?” The man stared at him and said no.

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Mexico sues US gunmakers, but will it make a dent in trafficking?

08/18/2021

Source: Al Jazeera

Mexico City, Mexico – Three years ago, Cresencio “Chencho” Pacheco became one of the estimated 357,000 people in Mexico forcibly displaced from their homes due to conflict and violence.

Pacheco became a spokesperson for himself and 1,600 of his neighbours who fled their villages in the mountains of Guerrero state when a local group armed with hand grenades and firearms took over the territory for drug trafficking and other illegal activities.

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Mexican villages arm children in desperate bid for attention

05/12/2021

Source: AP

AYAHUALTEMPA, Mexico (AP) — The children in this mountain village usually spend their days caring for goats or cows and playing with their dogs.

But on the rare occasions that the press comes to Ayahualtempa, the kids are lined up and handed guns.

They pull on the shirts of a community police force, cover their faces with handkerchiefs, grab their guns — fake wooden ones for the youngest — and line up in formation on the town’s basketball court to pose and march for the cameras.

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How American guns help Mexican cartels overwhelm Mexico’s police and military

04/02/2021

Source: Business Insider

Ciudad Juarez, MEXICO — Almost 50 years after Mexico’s first law to restrict the use of firearms was implemented in an attempt to keep the country at peace, Mexico finds itself flooded with foreign weapons.

Mexico’s prohibitive laws against firearms have not stopped thousands of weapons from being used in its streets, directly threatening its own security forces.

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‘They’re culpable’: the countries supplying the guns that kill Mexico’s journalists

12/09/2020

Source: The Guardian

It was around daybreak when Mexican crime reporter Luis Vallejo received a call from a local police officer telling him that a bag of human remains had been found in the city of Salamanca where he lives.

Vallejo had become accustomed to calls like this: in recent years, violence in Guanajuato, the surrounding region, has spiraled to unprecedented levels amid bloody turf wars between rival cartels.

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Mexico guns: Sniper rifles are flowing to Mexican drug cartels from the US

11/19/20

Source: The Washington Post

NOGALES, Mexico — North of the border, the .50-caliber sniper rifle is the stuff of YouTube celebrity, shown blasting through engine blocks and concrete walls. Deployed with U.S. troops to foreign wars, it is among the most destructive weapons legally available in the United States.

But every week, those rifles are trafficked across the border to Mexico, where increasingly militarized drug cartels now command arsenals that rival the weaponry of the country’s security forces. In many cases, criminals outgun police.

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US firearms are flooding Mexico one gun at at a time

09/18/2020

Source: Business Insider

A recent UN report shows that traffickers move weapons from the United States to Mexico in small quantities, even a single firearm at a time, in a divergence from global arms trafficking trends.

In its latest report on global firearms trafficking, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) noted that seizure data from 2016 and 2017 indicated that the flow of firearms at the US-Mexico border “appears to occur in smaller individual batches than the general global pattern.”

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Sheriff: Deputies Arrested in Mexico, Took Guns on Vacation

08/28/18 New York Times

Image result for united states police reutersReuters/Joe Penney

A Georgia sheriff says two deputies have been arrested for bringing guns to Mexico, where it’s illegal to carry such weapons.

Crisp County Sheriff Billy Hancock tells news outlets Martelle and Shawana Davis were traveling to Cancun for vacation and were taken into custody when they got off their flight there. The 36-year-old man and 31-year-old woman are married and both work for the sheriff’s office.

Hancock says they brought the guns as a safety precaution after several killings were recently reported in Cancun.

The sheriff says the couple were fined and returned to the U.S. Monday morning after being arrested Thursday night. He says they didn’t violate his office’s policy allowing officers to carry their weapons while off duty.

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Anger Management and Gun Control? New Ways to Reduce Violence in Latin America

3/29/16 Americas Quarterly

By Viridiana Rios, Mexico Institute Global Fellow

Reducing violence is not about controlling violent neighborhoods or even about controlling violent people. It is about inducing people to control themselves. That’s it. The best policing comes when no police are required.

The question is how to achieve this in Latin America, the most violent region in the world and home to countries like El Salvador, Honduras and Venezuela, each with homicide rates similar to war zones.

The answer may be unsettling. Many instances of large decreases in homicide rates in Latin America can be traced not to large-scale judicial or police reforms, but to changes in the behavior of gang members as a result of truces with their rivals. Homicides go down when rival drug gangs, in an effort to improve their business conditions, agree to reduce violence.

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