Life as an Entrepreneur in a Violent Mexico

08/15/16 MIT Technology Review

Alejandro Avila, the 30-year-old Mexican cofounder of Espiral, a mobile wallet service that he describes as “Square meets Stripe,” is on the edge of something big. Mexicans carry more than 100 million mobile phones and only 15 percent use credit cards, making financial tech a lucrative nascent market.

Yet Avila—whose family left Mexico in the 1990s only to return a decade later—faces a dangerous caveat to success.

Read more…

Armed vigilantes are taking the law into their own hands in Mexico’s second biggest city

07/13/16 Vice News 

crime and drugsJesús Morones, the owner of a candy shop in El Salto, a rugged industrial area on the southeastern fringe of the Guadalajara metropolitan area, says he’s been robbed at gunpoint eight times.

“Last time they beat me and locked me and my family in here for 10 minutes while they took what they wanted. They were looking for money but they even took a box of chocolates to snack on afterwards,” he says. “My son was crying and one of the bastards even grabbed my wife’s buttocks.”

Read more…

US sanctions 7 Mexico businesses over alleged drug gang ties

4/5/16 Daily Mail 

The United States has announced sanctions on seven Mexican businesses for presumed links to a drug trafficking gang called Los Cuinis.

The Treasury Department says the sanctions target four agricultural businesses and a biotech consulting firm in the Guadalajara region; a Mexico City tourism concern; and a company called Status Administrativo that is tied to a hotel seized by Mexican authorities last year.

Treasury says in a statement that all seven are linked to Los Cuinis’ alleged capo, Abigael Gonzalez Valencia, his wife or other associates.

The sanctions announced Monday freeze any of the entities’ assets that are under U.S. jurisdiction and bar Americans from entering into transactions with them.

Last December, Treasury sanctioned two Mexican newspapers and an air taxi company for purported ties to Los Cuinis.
Read more…

Mexican Women are being Abducted in Broad Daylight from Guadalajara’s Streets

3/29/2016 Women in the World, The New York Times

A rash of abductions and attempted kidnappings carried out in broad daylight and targeting young women has baffled and worried many in Mexico’s second-largest city, Guadalajara, the capital city of Jalisco state, which last year saw 1,161 women reported missing during the course of the year. That was before the abductions really began to surge in March, according to Vice News.

Read more…

Read the full story at Vice News…

Mexico captures son of drug kingpin in troubled western state

6/23/15 Reuters

hands in handcuffsMexican security forces in the western state of Jalisco have captured the son of one of the country’s most wanted drug lords, a state government spokesman said on Tuesday.

Ruben Oseguera, the son of Nemesio “El Mencho” Oseguera, is believed to be an important figure in his father’s gang, the Jalisco New Generation Cartel, which in recent weeks has become a major headache for President Enrique Pena Nieto.

The Jalisco government spokesman said he did not have details of the arrest, but another official in the state said the younger Oseguera, known as El Menchito, was captured in a pre-dawn army operation in a house in a western part of greater Guadalajara, the state capital.

Read more…

Violent new drug cartel alarming authorities in Mexico

ABC News, 5/2/2015

mexican flagAn increasingly strong drug cartel known as Jalisco New Generation was showing off its power with a spasm of violence that killed seven people and forced down a military helicopter in western Mexico, analysts said Saturday.

Jalisco state was relatively calm the day after gunmen set fire to cars, buses, banks and gasoline stations and trade gunfire with soldiers and police. The violence erupted after security forces launched a campaign against the cartel Friday.

Read more…

Suspected ‘narco blockades’ close roads in Guadalajara, Mexico with burning vehicles

Fox News, 5/1/2015

jaliscoAuthorities in western Mexico are asking residents to stay at home as they scramble to extinguish burning vehicles blocking roads in various parts of Guadalajara.

The prosecutor’s office in the western state of Jalisco used its Twitter account to ask residents of Guadalajara to remain calm Friday morning as authorities responded to the suspected blockades ignited by a drug cartel.

Read more…