Mexico’s War on Crime: A Decade of (Militarized) Failure

12/6/16 InSight Crime

Latin America's Economic Imperative: Felipe CalderonThis week marks ten years since Mexico‘s government embarked on a militarized campaign against the country’s criminal organizations, but while many criminal leaders have been captured or killed, a decade of confrontation has failed to substantially improve the nation’s security situation. On December 11, 2006, days after being sworn in, Mexico‘s then-President Felipe Calderón announced that his administration was deploying thousands of federal troops to combat organized crime in his home state of Michoacán.

Interior Minister Francisco Javier Ramírez Acuña said at the time that “the battle against organized crime is only just beginning, and it will be a fight that will take time.” Ten years later, Michoacán remains one of Mexico‘s most violent states.

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Mexico’s former president doesn’t want to talk about the bloody drug war he helped start

4/10/16 Business Insider

Felipe_Calderon,_World_Economic_Forum_2009_Annual_Meeting.jpg

Former Mexican President Felipe Calderon left office almost four years ago, but during his six-year term he presided over one of the most violent periods in modern Mexican history. Taking office in 2006, Calderon initiated a military-backed crackdown on organized crime that led to peaks in violence between 2010 and 2012. Calderon left office in 2012, and homicide rates have fallen and risen again under his successor, Enrique Peña Nieto.
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Mexico to Confront Criticisms From US Political Campaigns

3/1/16 ABC News

The Mexican government has come up with a plan to confront criticism of the country during the U.S. presidential campaigns, but it doesn’t include getting into verbal duels with the candidates.

The government instead will approach the campaigns of the Republican and Democratic nominees once they are chosen and share information about how the U.S. relationship with Mexico is an opportunity and not a threat, Francisco Guzman, an official in President Enrique Pena Nieto’s office, said Tuesday.

Outlining the plan to journalists, he said Mexican consulates in the U.S. have been instructed to start meeting with organizations and public opinion leaders to discuss the contributions Mexicans make to the United States.

Republican front-runner Donald Trump, in particular, has drawn attention in Mexico by talking about Mexican migrants being rapists and bringing drugs to the United States, and he has repeatedly promised to build a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

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Former Mexican President: We’re Not Paying for a ‘Stupid’ Wall

2/09/16 NBC News

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Felipe Calderón

 

A former Mexican president had some tough words when asked about GOP candidate Donald Trump’s much-touted plan to build a border wall that he says will be paid for by Mexico.”We are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall! And it’s going to be completely useless,” said former Mexican president Felipe Calderón when asked about this at the AmCham Egypt for Business Conference on Sunday.

“We are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall! And it’s going to be completely useless,” said former Mexican president Felipe Calderón when asked about this at the AmCham Egypt for Business Conference on Sunday.

Calderón had harsh words about the Republican presidential race during his conversation with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, saying it was “incredible” that quite an “admirable society” like the U.S. had candidates like Trump.

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Only two drug cartels left in Mexico and all others have splintered, top official says

06/16/15 Fox News Latino

Mexican_drug_cartels_2008It’s been over eight years since former Mexican President Felipe Calderón declared an offensive on the country’s drug trafficking organizations that left over an estimated 100,000 people dead on both sides.

In the coinciding years, a slew of drug cartels have risen to prominence to fill power vacuums left following the death or capture of their counterparts. But now, according to a high-ranking Mexican official, there are two cartels operating in the country: the stalwart Sinaloa cartel and the newer Jalisco-New Generation cartel.

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Mexico Increases Number of Missing to 22,322

08/21/14 ABC News

mexico-securityThe Mexican government has increased its calculation of the number of people who have disappeared since the start of the country’s drug war in 2006 and now lists 22,322 as missing, officials said Thursday. It had said in May that 8,000 people were missing.

Assistant Attorney General Mariana Benitez said 12,532 people went missing during the 2006-12 administration of President Felipe Calderon, who declared war on drug traffickers. An additional 9,790 have disappeared since President Enrique Pena Nieto took office on Dec. 1, 2012.

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Fighting Climate Change Is Profitable: Mexico’s Calderon

06/25/14 Bloomberg

energy -wind_energyCurbing climate change is profitable and nations must offer business incentives for low-carbon growth to cut fossil-fuel reliance, according to former president of Mexico, Felipe Calderon.

Countries must act jointly and in a “comprehensive” way, targeting the energy industry, cities, agriculture and forests as the main areas where runaway greenhouse gas emissions can be reined in, Calderon said in an interview in London. The former leader is now chairman of the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, a panel set up by seven nations including the U.K. to advise on the best ways to tackle global warming.

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