Headlines from Mexico

newspapers logo2-01

1. The President’s Office decided to cancel the traditional gala dinner hosted by the Mexican government on September 15 at the National Palace, according to official sources. The decision to cancel the gala was made due to the austerity measures adopted by the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto.

Read more: CNN México, Excelsior

2. The Head of the Secretary of Interior, Miguel Angel Osorio Chong, announced on Wednesday a series of appointments in the Secretary: Humberto Roque Villanueva as the new Sub-Secretary for Population, Migration and Religious Affairs; Felipe Muñoz Vázquez as the executive of the National Public Security System. Arturo Escobar y Vega will take charge of the Undersecretariat of Prevention and Citizen Participation.

Read more: CNN México, Excelsior, AristeguiNoticias, El Universal

3. The Mexican Senate received the proposal by President Enrique Peña Nieto to ratify Agustín Carstens as governor of the Bank of Mexico (Banxico) for a term of six years.

Read more: Forbes México, El Economista

4. The leader of the PRI Senators, Emilio Gamboa, stated that the parties in the Senate are close to releasing a document urging the PGR to create two  special prosecutor offices for the case of Ayotzinapa. If necessary he will convene the coordinators tomorrow or Monday morning.

Read more: Milenio 

5. Members of the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IMCI) for the case of Ayotzinapa, formally submitted the final report of their investigation to the President of the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH), Luis Raúl González Pérez.

Read more: La Jornada

‘El Chapo’ Guzman will be Mexican President Pena Nieto’s legacy

7/20/15 BBC News

Bernardo Montoya/Reuters
Bernardo Montoya/Reuters

It was either anger or laughter. But it was humour that won out, at least for the first 24 hours.

Pretty soon, fake selfies appeared on social media showing El Chapo outside Trump Tower smiling. A dig, of course, at businessman Donald Trump who outraged Mexicans recently when he said those who came to the US were “bringing drugs, bringing crime, they’re rapists”.

Sarcasm and dark humour are what seem to be getting Mexicans through these difficult times.

And these times are excruciating for President Enrique Pena Nieto too.

Read more…

UPCOMING EVENT! Advancing Justice Reform Sector in Mexico

justice - gavel and bookWHEN: Friday, June 26, 9:30-11:00am

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico’s deadline to fully implement new, adversarial criminal trial procedures is less than one year away. The government of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has pushed strongly to comply with the constitutionally mandated shift to the new criminal justice system by June 18, 2015, particularly in light of the country’s ongoing security challenges. Together with the University of San Diego’s Justice in Mexico program, the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a panel discussion to examine current efforts to implement the new reforms. The discussion will include a presentation of recent survey data on the views of judges, prosecutors, attorneys, and police, as well as insights from a delegation of visiting law professors attorneys from Mexico’s National Autonomous University as part of the Oral Advocacy Skill-building Immersion Seminar (OASIS) funded by the Mérida Initiative. This program will be conducted in English and Spanish.


“Justice in Mexico: The Road Traveled and the Road Ahead”
David Shirk, Global Fellow, Mexico Institute; Professor, University of San Diego

“Progress Report: Judicial Reform Implementation in Mexico”
Octavio Rodriguez, Esq., Coordinator, Justice in Mexico, University of San Diego

“La preparación de la próxima generación de abogados en México”
Leoba Castañeda, Dean, Law School, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

“Algunos retos para el nuevo sistema penal”
Alberto Del Castillo Del Valle, Professor, Law School, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México


Daniel Schneider, Professor, School of International Service, American University

Upcoming Event! Mexico’s Midterm Elections and the Peña Nieto Administration

Collage only_MonochromeWHEN: Monday, May 18, 9:30-11:00am

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Click here to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to an event on Mexico’s 2015 midterm elections. On June 7, 2015, more than 86 million Mexicans will have the opportunity to elect 500 federal deputies, 17 state-level legislatures, 9 governors, and more than 300 mayors. This new cohort of legislators will replace the group that approved the major reforms proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto during the first year of his administration. The new Chamber of Deputies will be crucial for the second half of Peña Nieto’s term in office; finding room for negotiation may prove increasingly difficult as the presidential succession nears.

These elections represent a battle in which the PRI seeks to stay strong despite the President’s low approval ratings. Meanwhile, the PAN and the PRD are trying to overcome internal divisions and emerge stronger. The PRD’s internal challenges became external with the recent founding of MORENA, led by Andrés Manuel López Obrador, which is emerging as a viable option for voters on the left. In fact, MORENA will be competing head to head with the Green Party (PVEM) to be the fourth national political force.


Denise Dresser
Political Analyst and Professor, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México

Luis Carlos Ugalde
Director General, Integralia Consultores


Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

RSVP here. 

Want to know more about Mexico’s midterm elections? Visit the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Election Guide.

Mexico’s Congress Passes Anti-Corruption Law

Reuters, 4/22/2015

Enrique Pena NietoMexico’s Congress has approved an anti-corruption law that could help relieve pressure on President Enrique Pena Nieto’s scandal-plagued government.

The law, passed late on Tuesday night, strengthens oversight of public officials and designates a special prosecutor to tackle corruption. It comes after several previous efforts to pass anti-graft measures failed.

The reform will give new powers to Mexico’s existing Federal Audit Office and the Public Administration Ministry (SFP), as well as creating a special court to oversee all corruption-related issues.

Read more…

Mexico’s President Rolls Out Plan to Save Endangered Porpoise

The New York Times, 4/16/2015

Peña Nieto
Peña Nieto

MEXICO CITY — President Enrique Peña Nieto and his top military commanders flew to a modest fishing village in Mexico’s far northwest on Thursday and made a promise to protect a small porpoise called the vaquita that is on the edge of extinction.

Standing near the dock where the fishermen of the village, San Felipe, unload their catches of shrimp, corvina and sierra, Mr. Peña Nieto ordered the Mexican Navy to take charge of the effort to halt the illegal fishing that has reduced the number of vaquitas to fewer than 100.

Read more…

Mexico Upset by Presidential Appointments for Key Posts

ABC News, 2/3/2015
Enrique Pena NietoPresident Enrique Pena is being criticized for having a possible conflict of interest in his nominations for attorney general and Mexico’s highest court.

Critics are blasting his choice of Arely Gomez to replace Jesus Murillo Karam as attorney general because she’s the sister of top Televisa news executive Leopoldo Gomez. He denied Tuesday he had any influence over his sister’s career.

Read more…