EVENT TOMORROW | Power Play: Energy & Manufacturing in North America

power playWHEN: Tomorrow, Tuesday, May 10, 9:00-10:30am

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, Canada Institute, and the International Monetary Fund are pleased to invite you to our launch of the book “Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America.” Despite the recent fall in energy prices, fuller development of energy resources in North America has potentially important implications for global energy markets and the competitiveness of North American manufacturing industries. The book “Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America” describes the transformation of the energy landscape in North America due to the upsurge in unconventional energy production since the mid-2000s and tells the story of the energy-manufacturing nexus from the perspective of Canada, Mexico, and the United States, and the region as a whole. Based on the research done at the International Monetary Fund, the book discusses the energy boom and its macroeconomic implications for the three countries individually and for the region overall, exploring also how the changing energy landscape can affect the potential benefits of greater integration across the three North American economies.

Keynote Speaker

Alejandro Werner
Director, Western Hemisphere Department
International Monetary Fund

Additional Speakers

Lusine Lusinyan
Senior Economist
International Monetary Fund

Carlos Hurtado
Alternate Executive Director for Mexico
International Monetary Fund

Jim Prentice
Global Fellow, Canada Institute, Wilson Center
Former Premier of Alberta
Former Minister of the Environment, Canada

Meg Lundsager
Public Policy Fellow, Wilson Center
Former U.S. Executive Director and Alternate Executive Director, International Monetary Fund

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

 

Op-Ed | Getting North America Right

5/9/2016 Mexico Institute blog, Forbes.com

By Earl Anthony Wayne, Public Policy Fellow, Wilson Center

nafta (2)When the leaders of Canada, Mexico and the United States meet on June 29 for a North American Leaders Summit (NALS), they will have two big tasks: 1) to explain clearly why cooperation between the three countries is of great value; and 2) to give clear directions to their officials to do the hard technical work so that cooperation produces solid results for economic growth and competitiveness, for mutual security, for the shared continental environment, and for international cooperation where we can do more together than individually.

Since Mexico hosted the last so-called “Three Amigos” Summit in 2014, the tone in the U.S. domestic political debate has turned very critical of cooperation across the continent, whereas the actual collaboration and mutual understanding between the governments has improved.  The potential to help make all three countries more competitive in the world and to become a model for regional cooperation has increased, even as the electoral campaign attacks on the relationship with the United States’ two top export markets sharpened starkly.

Read more…

UPCOMING EVENT | Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America

power playWHEN: Tuesday, May 10, 9:00-10:30 AM

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, Canada Institute, and the International Monetary Fund are pleased to invite you to our launch of the book “Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America.” Despite the recent fall in energy prices, fuller development of energy resources in North America has potentially important implications for global energy markets and the competitiveness of North American manufacturing industries. The book “Power Play: Energy and Manufacturing in North America” describes the transformation of the energy landscape in North America due to the upsurge in unconventional energy production since the mid-2000s and tells the story of the energy-manufacturing nexus from the perspective of Canada, Mexico, and the United States, and the region as a whole. Based on the research done at the International Monetary Fund, the book discusses the energy boom and its macroeconomic implications for the three countries individually and for the region overall, exploring also how the changing energy landscape can affect the potential benefits of greater integration across the three North American economies.

Keynote Speaker

Alejandro Werner
Director, Western Hemisphere Department
International Monetary Fund

Additional Speakers

Carlos Hurtado
Alternate Executive Director for Mexico
International Monetary Fund

Jim Prentice
Global Fellow, Canada Institute, Wilson Center
Former Premier of Alberta
Former Minister of the Environment, Canada

Meg Lundsager
Public Policy Fellow, Wilson Center
Former U.S. Executive Director and Alternate Executive Director, International Monetary Fund

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

New Publications | Global Agenda Council on the Future of Oil & Gas

Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood has been working with the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Oil and Gas for the past two years. They have now published several short publications and blog posts. Check them out below!

Blog Posts:

What happens when demand for oil peaks

Big oil has a big trust problem – can the industry put that right?

Publications:

Future Oil Demand Scenarios

Trust Challenges Facing Global Oil & Gas Industry

Future of Oil & Gas (synthesis)

Also, check out the Global Agenda Council on the Future of Oil and Gas’ webpage here: https://www.weforum.org/communities/global-agenda-council-on-the-future-of-oil-gas

Mexico Unleashes Gas Stations From Pemex

3/31/2016 Wall Street Journal

pemex2

MEXICO CITY—For the past eight decades, Mexican drivers have had only one choice of filling stations: state oil firm Petróleos Mexicanos. But that is going to change in coming months as the country’s first privately branded gasoline stations open for business.

Starting Friday, Mexico will allow private companies to import gasoline for the first time since the late 1930s, which had since been the exclusive domain of Pemex. The market opening paves the way for the country’s existing 11,400 filling stations—which are all Pemex franchises but independently owned—to link up with another company.

The changes are part of a sweeping 2014 overhaul that ended Mexico’s state monopoly of the energy sector, allowing oil-and-gas firms to explore and produce oil directly. But new oil is still years away, and low prices have sapped some of the initial enthusiasm. That leaves gas stations as a place where drivers can notice the changes first.

Read more…

Mexico and the Nuclear Summit: Can Peña Nieto Seize the Opportunity?

3/31/2016 The Expert Take, Mexico Institute

expert I (2)By Duncan Wood and Cristina Contreras

President Enrique Peña Nieto is in Washington this week to participate in the Nuclear Summit hosted by U.S. President Obama. While most attention has been focused on the participation of other countries in the talks, the explicit request by the United States government for the Mexican President’s presence offers an opportunity to focus on Mexico’s highly positive role in the global nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards regime. Although Mexico is not a major nuclear player, with no nuclear weapons and only one nuclear power plant of note (Laguna Verde, a 1.365 GW capacity plant that produces 4.5% of the nation’s electricity), the country has nonetheless played an important role in the history of non-proliferation and continues to be a showcase for best practices in the nuclear safeguards realm.

Mexico is a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), ratifying the treaty in 1969 and the Additional Protocol in 2004. It is also party to the 1979 Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, ratified in 1988. Most importantly, however, Mexico became a pioneer of the non-proliferation movement through the 1967 hosting and negotiation of the Treaty of Tlatelolco (Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean).  This groundbreaking treaty among the nations of the western hemisphere was instrumental in making Latin America a nuclear weapons-free zone. Just as significant as the impact of the treaty in the hemisphere has been its legacy in Mexico’s foreign service, where it is seen as representing the pinnacle of Mexican diplomatic prowess. Mexico serves as the depository for the treaty. Alfonso Garcia Robles, the Mexican diplomat who was the driving force behind the treaty and who later became foreign minister, received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1982 for his achievement.

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Mexico Attracts $2.6 Billion in Investments in Power Sale Rerun

Bloomberg Business 3/30/2016

Energy -electricity_transmission_linesRenewable energy developers including Acciona SA and an Enel SpA unit are set to spend $2.6 billion on power plants in Mexico after winning bids in the country’s first-ever electricity auction.

Acciona, Enel Green Power, SunPower Systems and Recurrent Energy were among the 11 companies that won rights to generate and sell 2,085 megawatts of clean power to the state-owned Comision Federal de Electricidad, Mexico said Wednesday.

While the sale was the first since Mexico decided in 2013 to allow private companies to compete for power contracts, it was actually the second time the country ran the auction. The government was forced to hold the sale again after an initial one was botched by a flawed bid from Gestamp Wind. The previous auction had resulted in fewer megawatts contracted and less investments committed, according to results the government has since thrown out.

Read more…