The future looks bright for solar energy development in Mexico

02/19/2018 PV Magazine

Nellis_AFB_Solar_panelsMexico is set to become the largest solar PV market in Latin America, with around 2 GW of installs expected annually. Political and regulatory uncertainty do not appear to be affecting investor interest, with more opportunities than challenges present. pv magazine attended GTM Research’s Solar Summit Mexico last week to report on the latest developments in the Mexican market.

GTM Research’s Solar Summit Mexico, which took place in Mexico City on February 13 and 14, provided a comprehensive insight into the Mexican solar energy landscape.

All participants were in agreement that Mexico is on track to become one of the world’s most interesting solar markets in the coming years. Despite the challenges, which were highlighted during the conference by CEOs, analysts and government officials, the market presents an abundance of opportunities across all segments, chiefly due to its stable regulatory framework, which was created alongside the country’s energy reform three years ago.

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Mexico becomes first Latin American country to join the IEA

02/19/2018 United Press International

environment - energy - light bulb with paddy riceBy entering the “most important energy forum in the world,” Mexico is the newest, and first Latin American, country to join the IEA, its government announced.

Mexico deposited its signature on the treaty for the International Energy Agency in Belgium during the weekend, becoming the first member in Latin America.

“With this final step, Mexico enters the most important energy forum in the world,” Mexican Energy Secretary Joaquín Coldwell said in a statement. “We will take our part in setting the world’s energy policies, receive experienced advisory in best international practices, and participate in emergency response exercises.”

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UPCOMING EVENT | Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

9781477312742WHEN: Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 9:00-11:00 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

RSVP

Los Zetas where once Mexico’s most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies.

Author

Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University; Global Fellow, Wilson Center

Commentators

Vanda Felbab Brown, Senior Fellow, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Steven Dudley, Co-director, InSight Crime

Nicholas Miroff, National Security Correspondent, The Washington Post

Moderator

Eric L. Olson, Senior Adviser, Mexico Institute; Deputy Director, Latin American Program Wilson Center

RSVP

Shell sweeps nine of 19 blocks awarded in Mexico oil auction

02/01/2018 Reuters

shell by Azfar Hakim
Photo by Flickr user Azfar Hakim

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell snapped up nine of 19 Gulf of Mexico oil and gas blocks awarded in a Mexican auction on Wednesday, as the global oil major raised its big bet on Latin America’s deep waters.

Mexican officials estimated the auction, the most important since the country’s energy sector opened to foreign firms in 2014, could bring $93 billion in investment to the country as oil firms develop the areas they won.

The stakes were high for Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and his struggling party, which wants to showcase the results of its energy liberalization ahead of a presidential election in July.

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Mexico Holds Oil Bids Like There’s No Tomorrow Before Election

01/25/2018  Bloomberg
energy - gas pumpMexico is trying to lure as much oil investment as possible before the president who overhauled the country’s energy industry leaves.

 By the end of the summer, the country that until recently had a state monopoly on crude will have offered more than 100 permits to oil majors like Exxon Mobil Corp. in three auctions this year. The last bidding round, announced on Wednesday, will cover an area bigger than Delaware.
The pace of sales is unprecedented as the country prepares to say goodbye to the presidency of President Enrique Pena Nieto, who oversaw a complete makeover of the country’s energy laws to lure foreign investment into everything from oil fields to pipelines to refineries.

A rare opportunity to improve the health of Mexico’s environment and economy

12/4/2017 Environmental Defense Fund

This post originally appeared in Spanish on El Universal.

Not often is a pollutant referred to as an environmental and economic opportunity. But that’s exactly what methane is for countries looking for cost-effective climate solutions and a way to prepare for the 21st century energy economy. And it’s especially important for Mexico right now, as changes in energy laws have opened the doors to a slew of new exploration projects that could reshape Mexico’s oil and gas industry and boost economic growth through 2025.

Methane is the main ingredient of natural gas. When burned, natural gas emits less carbon dioxide than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes unburned, as it does across the global oil and gas industry, methane is 80 per cent more powerful a heat-trapper than carbon dioxide in the short term. Methane also contributes to local air pollution, including smog, and the health impacts that come with it. It’s not just countries that are aware of this. A growing number of investors and energy companies are responding to the reputational threat of uncontrolled methane emissions.

Released last week, the International Energy Agency’s latest World Energy Outlook articulates the methane challenge very powerfully. Its analysis shows that with current technologies the oil and gas industry can drastically reduce methane emissions by 75 percent worldwide – and that up to two thirds of those reductions can be realized at zero net cost. What’s more, the IEA says that just the cost-effective reductions would have the same climate impact in 2100 as immediately closing all the coal plants in China.

Read the full article on EDF’s Energy Exchange Blog…

 

Big New Mexico wind energy project faces public hearing

11/20/2017 The Seattle Times

A proposed eastern New Mexico wind energy project that will be the subject of a public hearing next week has a large group of backers but also faces a substantial number of opponents, including staff at the state’s utility regulation commission.

Hundreds of wind turbines would be erected near the town of Portales close to the Texas border under the proposal by Minnesota-based energy giant Xcel Energy, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported Sunday.

Xcel subsidiary Southwestern Public Service Co. has said the project would create hundreds of construction jobs and more than two dozen permanent ones when it is completed.

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