Can Mexico’s Electoral Authority Stop Criminal Funding?

May 11, 2015

5/11/2015 InSight Crime

voting mexicoMexico is weeks away from a landmark midterm election, but many analysts worry that the nation’s electoral authorities are dropping the ball as far as criminal organizations financing their preferred candidates.

On June 7, Mexico will elect the entire lower house of congress, nine governorships, and local offices in more than half the country. While the Senate and the presidency are not in play, it is the most important date in the electoral calendar prior to the 2018 election.

Against that backdrop, some analysts are worried that the nation’s campaign regulatory agency, the National Electoral Institute (INE), is not doing enough to prevent the flow of money stemming from organized crime into candidates’ campaign war chests. Jesus Tovar Mendoza, the Executive Director of the think tank Red de Estudios sobre la Calidad de la Democracia en America Latina, recently complained to E-Consulta that the statutes enforced by the INE are insufficient.

Read more…

For more analysis on Mexico’s 2015 midterm elections, visit the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Elections Guide.


Upcoming Event! Mexico’s Midterm Elections and the Peña Nieto Administration

May 11, 2015

Collage only_MonochromeWHEN: Monday, May 18, 9:30-11:00am

WHERE: 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Click here to RSVP.

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to an event on Mexico’s 2015 midterm elections. On June 7, 2015, more than 86 million Mexicans will have the opportunity to elect 500 federal deputies, 17 state-level legislatures, 9 governors, and more than 300 mayors. This new cohort of legislators will replace the group that approved the major reforms proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto during the first year of his administration. The new Chamber of Deputies will be crucial for the second half of Peña Nieto’s term in office; finding room for negotiation may prove increasingly difficult as the presidential succession nears.

These elections represent a battle in which the PRI seeks to stay strong despite the President’s low approval ratings. Meanwhile, the PAN and the PRD are trying to overcome internal divisions and emerge stronger. The PRD’s internal challenges became external with the recent founding of MORENA, led by Andrés Manuel López Obrador, which is emerging as a viable option for voters on the left. In fact, MORENA will be competing head to head with the Green Party (PVEM) to be the fourth national political force.

Speakers

Denise Dresser
Political Analyst and Professor, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México

Luis Carlos Ugalde
Director General, Integralia Consultores

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

RSVP here. 

Want to know more about Mexico’s midterm elections? Visit the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Election Guide.


Infographic: Local Elections in 2015 in Mexico

April 14, 2015

During the 2015 elections in Mexico, 17 states will renew governorships, municipalities, and/or local congresses. Outcomes at the local level could change the political map of the country. This infographic illustrates the states that will hold local elections in 2015, as well as the type of election each will hold.

For more news and analysis on the 2015 midterm elections, check out the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Elections Guide: https://mexicoinstituteonelections2015.wordpress.com/

Local elections map

Click here to view the infographic. 


Governing Parties at the State-Level in Mexico

April 9, 2015

Outcomes of the 2015 local-level elections in Mexico could change the political map of the country as some parties could be strengthened and others weakened. With the parties entering their two-month campaign season, this infographic takes a look at the current representation of parties at the state level.

For more news and analysis on the 2015 midterm elections, check out the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Elections Guide:https://mexicoinstituteonelections2015.wordpress.com/

Current governors mapClick here to see the infographic.


Infographic: The 2015 Election

April 8, 2015

Federal and local campaigns began Sunday, April 5, in Mexico. With the parties entering their two-month campaign season, this infographic takes a look at the current representation of parties in the Chamber of Deputies.

For more news and analysis on the 2015 midterm elections, check out the Mexico Institute’s 2015 Elections Guide.

Chamber of Deputies To see a larger version of the infographic, click here.


NEW PUBLICATION: Violence and Citizen Participation in Mexico: From the Polls to the Streets

January 13, 2015

By Sandra Ley

Resilient Communities Series15How do citizens cope politically with violence? In the face of rising insecurity, Mexican citizens, particularly victims, have poured into the streets to demand an end to violence and ask for peace and justice. However, as organized crime groups attempt to influence local elections and target political candidates and public officials, citizens have not felt equally encouraged to cast ballots on election day.

Elections in Mexico, as well as in other Latin American countries such as Brazil and Guatemala, have been marked by criminal violence. Voters, public officials, and candidates alike have been threatened or attacked by organized crime groups. It is, therefore, important to examine how violence shapes various forms of participation. This paper seeks to provide a broad view of political participation in the midst of Mexico’s current security crisis, with the goal of understanding the effects of violence on civic activism.

This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Read the publication here…


Mexico Vigilante Leader Demands Community Rule

July 2, 2014

7/1/14 ABC News

protest -- stroke -- resistanceThe leader of one of the first vigilante movements to spring up in Mexico last year filed a petition Tuesday demanding that the government allow communities in the southern state of Guerrero to elect local officials with open assemblies and show-of-hand votes.

Vigilante leader Bruno Placido said the petition filed with the Federal Electoral Tribunal asks specifically that the collective-vote system be allowed in the town of San Luis Acatlan. But Placido said his People’s Union movement would push for the system to be adopted in all 27 townships where vigilante forces known as “community police” now operate.

Read more…


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