High Demand for Bilingual Schoolteachers Has Educators Crossing U.S.-Mexico Border

10/3/16 Fox News Latino

When 36-year-old Jan García from Monterrey, Mexico, went to study for a bachelor’s degree in education in Minnesota 15 years ago, she quickly realized that her professional future lay in the classroom.Yet her dream of teaching English to elementary school children in Mexico was complicated by the country’s highly-politicized public education system which refused to recognize her qualification.

Now, however, García sees a new route to fulfilling her dream. She is currently planning to study her master’s degree in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL) at a U.S. university and pay her way by teaching in the public school system where demand for Spanish-speaking educators is growing.

Nearly half a million U.S. citizens are enrolled in Mexican schools. Many of them are struggling

09/14/16 Los Angeles Times

4016878387_6c06622439_oTwo decades ago, a team of U.S. and Mexican researchers descended on Dalton, Ga., to study the growing number of Mexican immigrants who had come to work in the city’s carpet mills.

Victor Zuñiga, a sociologist at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education, was interested in what the demographic shift meant for local schools, so he sat down with a teacher who told him something he couldn’t get out of his head.

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Child labour in Mexico

08/20/16 Al Jazeera

education - school children“Education for everyone” has been a popular slogan since the Mexican revolution over 100 years ago.

But according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, eight out of 100 Mexican children who enroll in elementary school, do not show up for classes.

While barely 50 complete middle school, 20 graduate from high school, 13 get a bachelor’s degree, and only two become graduate students.

A study released by UNESCO last year says the children who don’t attend school are mostly working. The report reveals that at least 21 percent of all Mexican youth between the ages of seven and 14 drop out of school – that’s around 651,000 children.

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Mexican Billionaire Carlos Slim’s Foundation Launches Free Online Educational App

06/16/2016 Forbes

slimAs part of his philosophy that philanthropic foundations do not solve poverty but knowledge does, Mexican telecom tycoon Carlos Slim Helú launched Aprende.org, a free online educational platform aimed at expanding opportunities to anyone with a smartphone and an internet connection, his foundation announced Wednesday.

“This is an important achievement for Mexico and can be a model for other nations,” Slim said during a press conference at his Museo Soumaya in Mexico City, according to Uno TV, Slim’s online TV news channel.


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Mexico to Rely on Financial Tools to Boost Investment

9/2/2015 Wall Street Journal

financeMEXICO CITY—Days before Mexico’s government unveils the most austere budget in years because to falling oil prices, President Enrique Peña Nieto has decided to rely on new financial tools to boost investment in such key sectors as education, infrastructure and energy.

“Mexico will be developing innovative financial instruments that will allow us to capture more capital flows…and to direct them to infrastructure projects,” said Mr. Peña Nieto in his annual state of the nation address Wednesday at the National Palace.

In his speech, Mr. Peña Nieto said the government will be issuing education infrastructure bonds to obtain from investors around $3 billion in the next three years to help improve public schools. The funds will complement education budgets.

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Mexico Temporarily Cancels Teacher Testing in Oaxaca, Michoacan

06/22/15 Telesur

oaxacaThe Mexican Secretariat for Public Education (SEP) announced Sunday it has suspended the teacher evaluations in the states of Oaxaca and Michoacan, saying “the necessary conditions” were not in place for the process to go ahead. The decision follows a series of protests and boycott threats by the teacher’s of the CNTE union, which staunchly opposes the proposed evaluation process. Authorities said the evaluations were conducted as planned in other states of Mexico like Chiapas and Guerrero, where dissident teachers also advised they would attempt to disrupt the process.

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Mexico drops certification requirement for US-schooled kids

06/16/15 Associated Press

— Mexico on Monday enacted a measure meant to help hundreds of thousands of young migrants who have returned from the United States, dropping a requirement that they provide government-certified, translated copies of foreign school records in order to study in Mexico.

Mexico had required records be certified with a seal known as an apostille and be translated by a certified translator in Mexico.

The costly and cumbersome process had discouraged hundreds of thousands of returning migrant children from going to school in Mexico, or meant they could only audit courses without official recognition. Hundreds of thousands of children have returned to Mexico, mainly from the United States, after their parents were deported or chose to return.

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