Falling Oil Prices: Changing Implications for Global Producers

February 6, 2015

02/04/2015 Woodrow Wilson Center

As the price of oil continues to fall, the Wilson Center’s Africa Program, Canada Institute, Kennan Institute, Latin American Program, Middle East Program, Mexico Institute and its Regional and Global Energy Series convened an expert global panel, assembled from Russia, Colombia, Canada, Iran, and Nigeria, to discuss the economic and political repercussions of depressed energy prices, as well as the effects of the lower prices on competitiveness and investment.


Oil-Price Collapse May Aggravate Producing Nations’ Other Problems

February 6, 2015

1/5/2015 Oil & Gas Journal

energy - oil barrelsThe recent global crude-oil price plunge could be aggravating underlying problems in Mexico, Colombia, and other Western Hemisphere producing nations, speakers suggested during a Feb. 4 discussion at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

“Mexico is a perfect storm—a serious production decline and a low oil price,” said Duncan Wood, who directs the center’s Mexico Institute. “It instituted modest energy reforms that look more like service agreements than production-sharing contracts. This might explain why only seven [international oil companies] have asked to see data rooms for the 14 offered contracts. There’s a perception the program has failed.”

Continued lower crude prices could force Mexico’s government to make moves so there would be more interest from outside the country, Wood said. “If it does, it could affect social programs and affect the popularity of [President Enrico Pena Nieto’s] government.”

Read more…

Watch the video from the event here.


Mexico Deports Record Numbers of Women and Children in US-Driven Effort

February 4, 2015

2/4/2015 The Guardian

Border fenceRecord numbers of women and children fleeing violence and poverty in Central America were deported by Mexican authorities last year, as part of US-driven operations to stem the flow of migrants reaching the American border.

More than 24,000 women were deported from Mexico in 2014 – double the number sent home in 2013. The upsurge in child detentions was even sharper – climbing 230% to just over 23,000, Mexican interior ministry figures reveal…

Duncan Wood, director of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Centre, said: “Mexico knows the southern border is the biggest weakest spot of the country where it is most vulnerable to organised crime, undocumented migration and non-traditional threats like infectious diseases. The Peña Nieto government is trying to get a handle on it and reassert sovereignty. The US has offered help with great gusto.”

Read more…


Mexico-United States Relations: Howdy, Pardner

January 8, 2015

1/7/2015 The Economist

President Obama visits Mexico President Enrique Pena NietoThe leaders of the United States and Mexico, who met in Washington on January 6th, have both experienced dramatic changes of fortune in recent months. Barack Obama, who looked feeble in the face of a divided Congress, has taken bold actions on immigration and Cuba that have endeared him to Latin Americans. Enrique Peña Nieto, whom Mr. Obama must have envied for his ability to persuade Mexico’s Congress to launch historic reforms, has instead been clobbered by crime and scandal.

But this reversal of fortune did not upset the mutual esteem that has improved a cross-border relationship once fraught with insecurity and friction. More than their predecessors, Mr. Obama and Mr. Peña recognize “the need to focus on the good news”, even if that means downplaying such issues as corruption and the arms and drugs money that flow into Mexico from the United States, says Duncan Wood, head of the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington.

Read more…


Mexico’s Peña Nieto to meet Obama at the White House

January 6, 2015

1/6/2015 Al Jazeera America

Capture

Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood discusses the Mexican president’s visit to the United States in this interview on Al Jazeera America.

To watch, click here.


Unleashing Innovation in Mexico: What Can be Done?

December 30, 2014

12/30/2014 Wilson Center NOW

Innovation2The key to any nation’s success is finding ways to unleash innovation in pursuit of solving problems. But where does innovation come from and what is necessary for building an environment in which it can flourish? Public and private sector activity in Mexico is the focus of our discussion with Mexico Institute Director, Duncan Wood in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

Watch here…


New Publication: Integrating North America’s Energy: A Call for Action

December 17, 2014

By Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute

stock-footage-montage-of-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-pollutionIn February 2014, the leaders of the three North American nations met in Toluca, Mexico, and determined a range of measures to enhance regional competitiveness, including new initiatives on transportation infrastructure, borders and research cooperation. Furthermore, the leaders agreed that, before the end of 2014, a North American Energy Ministers Meeting should take place to “define areas for strong trialteral cooperation on energy.” What these areas might be is still unannounced, but with the successful passage of energy reform legislation through Mexico’s Congress in December 2013, and secondary legislation in August 2014, many of the previously existing barriers to cooperation on oil and gas markets have now disappeared.

The prospects for an energy abundant North America are compelling. Combined, the three countries’ oil production compares favorably with those of the Middle East. As the United States surpassed Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest producer, and with both Mexico and Canada on the verge of significant increases in production, North America’s long-standing position as a hydrocarbons importer will then be reversed. The outlook for North American energy is therefore bright, and the transformation in the regional energy paradigm has been dramatic. However, to achieve the full potential of this newly discovered regional energy wealth, it will be necessary to more fully integrate the three countries’ energy markets. This paper argues that, in order to make North American energy independence a reality, there are several main areas that require attention from the three governments, working together, to make the transition to an integrated North American energy system.

Read the report here.


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