Mexico Nabs Suspected Zetas Cartel Figure Near Texas Border

March 24, 2015

Yahoo News, 3/23/2015

handcuffsMEXICO CITY (AP) — A suspected leader of the violent Zetas drug cartel who was on Mexico’s list of 122 priority targets for arrest was captured early Monday in a city on the Texas border, authorities said.

Ramiro Perez Moreno, 34, was arrested without any shots being fired in the city of Nuevo Laredo, across from Laredo, Texas, the Mexican navy said in a statement.

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City in Mexico Bans Narco Songs

March 24, 2015

By Arron Daugherty, InSight Crime, 3/16/2015

musical noteA ban on music inspired by drug trafficking and organized crime bosses underscores the illicit trade’s impact on modern Mexican culture.

The city council in the capital of Mexico’s northern Chihuahua state has implemented a ban on performing and distributing a genre of music known as “narcocorridos” within city limits,reported Excelsior.

Violators are subject to fines of around $20,000 dollars and up to 36 hours in jail. Chihuahua state’s legislature approved a statewide ban on narcocorridos in 2011, but it was never implemented by municipalities. The capital’s city council has decided to put the ban into action and stiffen the penalties as they believe narcocorridos promote crime and violence while apologizing for and glorifying organized crime figures, according to Excelsior.

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UPCOMING EVENT! U.S.-Mexico Relations, Security and Human Rights

March 10, 2015

mexico-usa-flag-montageWHEN: Tuesday, March 17, 4:30-6:00pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP.

Mexico has experienced an intense security crisis, organized crime wave and an explosion in violent crime. In the past, scholars, analysts, and media commentators have overlooked the central role of U.S. policy towards Mexico, instead framing the discussion in terms of a battle over territory and political control between drug trafficking organizations and the state.

While drawing on contemporary debates, this event will go beyond these often limited discussions about the causes and factors which have culminated in Mexico’s most violent period since the Revolution. In particular, it will consider the role of U.S. policy, including the extent to which Mexico’s struggle against organized crime and bilateral policy have affected the security situation, and will explore potential solutions to the crisis in an attempt to foster a new debate about the role of the United States in Mexico.

Chair:
Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Keynote Speaker:
Mónica Serrano, Professor, International Relations, El Colegio de México

Discussants:
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Benjamin T. Smith, Associate Professor, Latin American History, University of Warwick

Mariclaire Acosta, Director, Freedom House, Mexico

For more information, click here.


Top Mexican Drug Cartel Leaders Captured or Killed in Recent Years

February 27, 2015

The Associated Press, U.S. News and World Report, 2/27/2015

hands in handcuffsMEXICO CITY (AP) — Recent captures or killings of top Mexican drug cartel leaders:

— Feb. 27, 2015: Authorities say federal police capture Servando “La Tuta” Gomez, one of the world’s most-wanted drug lords who once terrorized Michoacan state as leader of the Knights Templar cartel.

— Oct. 9, 2014: Mexican officials announce the arrest of Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, purported leader of the Juarez cartel.

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Servando ‘La Tuta’ Gomez, Mexico’s Most Wanted Drug Lord, Captured: Officials

February 27, 2015

Raul Torres and Erin McClam, NBC News, 2/27/2015

Getty Images

Getty Images

One of the most wanted drug lords in Mexico has been captured, authorities said Friday.

Servando Gomez, known as La Tuta, the leader of the Knights Templar cartel, was arrested overnight, Mexican authorities told Telemundo.

Gomez was the target of a push by President Enrique Peña Nieto to regain control of the state of Michoacán, which has been wracked by clashes between the cartel and heavily armed vigilantes trying to oust them.

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Mexico Complains About Remarks Attributed to Pope Over Drug Image

February 24, 2015

Reuters, 2/23/2015

Reuters/Tony Gentile

Reuters/Tony Gentile

aid on Monday it would send a letter to the Vatican to complain about remarks attributed to Pope Francis about the risk of Argentina suffering a criminal “Mexicanization” due to the spread of drug gangs there.

Mexico’s Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade said his government had expressed concern that the country was being “stigmatized” as a land of drug traffickers in an email attributed to Francis published in Argentina over the weekend.

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NEW PUBLICATION: Violence and Insecurity in Guerrero

February 5, 2015

By Chris Kyle

Resilient Communities Series15This paper is a continuation of the series Building Resilient Communities in Mexico: Civic Responses to Crime and Violence, a multiyear effort by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego to analyze the obstacles to and opportunities for improving citizen security in Mexico.

Insecurity and violence associated with organized criminal activity are pervasive in Mexico’s southern state of Guerrero.  The state’s homicide rate is the highest in the country and extortion and kidnapping are commonplace.  For perpetrators, there is near complete impunity.  The state is divided into territories within which either drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) or community policing networks exercise control over local policing functions.  Local, state, or federal authorities occasionally join this competition, but for the most part policing powers are held by others.  In rural areas competition between groups of traffickers over the state’s prodigious narcotics output has created violent no-man’s-lands in buffer zones between territories controlled by rival groups.  In cities violence is mostly a byproduct of efforts to establish and preserve monopolies in extortion, kidnapping, and retail contraband markets.  Despite claims to the contrary by state and federal authorities, there has been no discernible improvement in public security in recent months or years.

Restraining the violence in Guerrero will require that state authorities make a systematic effort to address two existing realities that sustain the criminal activities producing violence.  Thus, this paper examines the security situation in the state of Guerrero, including the operation of drug trafficking organizations, and proposes possible solutions to the security crisis.

Read the paper here.


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