Drugs, Human Rights, Trade, and Distrust: The Evolution of U.S.-Mexican Relations

11/10/2015 By Tom Long, War on the Rocks

President Obama visits Mexico President Enrique Pena NietoLast month, citing human rights concerns, the United States quietly withheld about $5 million in counternarcotics assistance for Mexico. The State Department declined to certify that Mexico met conditions imposed on the aid by Congress under the Leahy Amendment, triggering the 15-percent reduction in funding for Mexican security agencies. Though more than $140 million of other U.S. funding will continue to flow, the decision — first reported by The Washington Post and confirmed by a deputy spokesman at the State Department — was cheered by human rights advocates. A senior official at Human Rights Watch told The New York Times that the cut was “unprecedented.”

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NarcoData: The 40 year-history of drug cartels in Mexico

10/27/2015 El Daily Post

narcodataNarcoData is a data journalism project in which Animal Politico and El Daily Post explain the evolution and growth of organized crime in Mexico.

There are nine active cartels in Mexico, a country threatened by violence.

Drug cartel leaders become the stuff of legend…Organized crime in Mexico is disproportionately large and its framework is difficult to understand because the cartels don’t just participate in the rapidly growing drugs market, they also sponsor dozens of criminal cells that extort and terrorize the public.

Animal Politico identified the need to explain the growth of organized crime and created NarcoData — an interactive website that offers an in-depth study of the past four decades of organized crime in Mexico — so that our readers can more easily understand how it has evolved.

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Event This Thursday! Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

18007563WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Click here to RSVP.

Kingpin El Chapo Guzmán’s Prison Escape Triggers Wave Of Extraditions From Mexico To The U.S.

10/1/2015 Forbes

19437624579_88eab701c8_bIn a painful admission that its prisons have been compromised by powerful drug cartels, as proven by the recent spectacular escape of drug lord Joaquín El Chapo Guzmán from a maximum security prison, the Mexican government has taken the unprecedented move of extraditing 13 high-level criminals to the U.S.

The Department of Justice disclosed Wednesday that 13 individuals, including alleged high-level cartel members, arrived in the U.S. late in the day and were placed in the custody of U.S. Marshals Service. They will face charges of drug trafficking-related crimes, homicide, money laundering and rape pending in Texas, Georgia, Louisiana, California, Illinois, Arizona and Arkansas.

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Upcoming Book Event! Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

18007563WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP. 

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

“Beguiling, and even crazily enchanting…Prayers for the Stolen gives us words for what we haven’t had words for before, like something translated from a dream in a secret language.” – New York Times Book Review

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Keynote Speaker
Jennifer Clement, Author

Moderator
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

Upcoming Event! Book Event: Prayers for the Stolen, A Discussion of Violence against Women in Mexico

WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 4:00-5:30pm

WHERE: Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Click here to RSVP. 

“Beguiling, and even crazily enchanting…Prayers for the Stolen gives us words for what we haven’t had words for before, like something translated from a dream in a secret language.” – New York Times Book Review

A New York Times Book Review’s Editors Choice, Prayers for the Stolen has brought to light the scale of abduction of young girls into sex slavery in Mexico. Clement will be reading from and discussing Prayers for the Stolen, the result of ten years of research, which included interviews with women of drug traffickers, girls and women in rural communities and prisoners in Mexico City’s Santa Martha jail. An illuminating and affecting portrait of women in rural Mexico, and a stunning exploration of the hidden consequences of the drug war, Prayers for the Stolen is an unforgettable story of friendship, family, and determination.

The Mexico Institute and Politics and Prose are pleased to invite you to a talk by author Jennifer Clement on the writing of her book Prayers for the Stolen.

Jennifer Clement is a leading chronicler of contemporary Mexico. Her work has been translated into 24 languages and has garnered international acclaim such as the New York Times Editor’s Choice, the NEA Fellowship for Literature, the UK’s Canongate Prize, France’s Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, the PEN/Faulkner Prize shortlist, and the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement is a Santa Maddalena Fellow and member of Mexico’s prestigious “Sistema Nacional de Creadores”. As president of PEN Mexico, her work focused on the disappearance and killing of journalists.

Keynote Speaker
Jennifer Clement, Author, Prayers for the Stolen

Moderator
Andrew Selee, Executive Vice President, Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

US-Mexico border drug tunnel found near Tijuana

08/03/15 BBC NEWS

TijuanaSecurity forces in Mexico have discovered an underground tunnel aimed at crossing into the United States.

The unfinished tunnel, in the border city of Tijuana, is believed to have been built by the Sinaloa cartel with the aim of smuggling drugs into the US.

Last month Joaquin “Shorty” Guzman, the leader of the Sinaloa cartel, escaped from a maximum security jail through a 1.5km-long (1 mile) tunnel.

Guzman, one of the world’s most wanted drug dealers, is still on the run.

Officials from the federal prosecutor’s office said the tunnel was 123m (404ft) long, but came just short of crossing the border.

Read more…

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