Italy halts auction of archaeological artifacts on Mexico’s request

09/21/2021

Source: Mexico News Daily

Italian authorities intervened to cancel an auction in Rome at which 17 Mexican archaeological artifacts were to go on the block.

Culture Minister Alejandra Frausto said the timely action of Mexico’s ambassador in Italy, Carlos García de Alba, and the European nation’s chief of police for the protection of cultural heritage, Roberto Riccardi, were crucial to the suspension of the auction, which the Bertolami Fine Arts auction house planned to hold last Thursday.

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Below a pyramid, a treasure trove sheds new light on ancient Mexican rites

09/01/2021

Source: Reuters

More than a decade after Sergio Gomez began excavating a tunnel under a towering Mexican pyramid, the archeologist still spends most of his time studying the massive cache of sacred artifacts carefully placed there by priests some 2,000 years ago.

The volume and variety of objects hidden in the sealed tunnel under Teotihuacan’s ornate Feathered Serpent Pyramid has shattered records for discoveries at the ancient city, once the most populous metropolis of the Americas and now a top tourist draw just outside modern-day Mexico City.

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Mexico: Builders bulldozing outskirts of Teotihuacan ruins

05/26/2021

Source: Associated Press

The Mexican government said Tuesday that a private building project is destroying part of the outskirts of the pre-Hispanic ruin site of Teotihuacán, just north of Mexico City.

The Culture Department said it has repeatedly issued stop-work orders since March but the building crews have ignored them. The department estimated at least 25 ancient structures on the site are threatened, and it has filed a criminal complaint against those responsible.

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Mexican women protest violence via art, breastfeeding

photo of woman breastfeeding her child
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11/26/19 – AP News

By Amy Guthrie and Ginnette Riquelme

Women’s groups protested at cultural institutions in Mexico’s capital ahead of Monday’s International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, using painting, crocheting and breastfeeding to call attention to rampant violence and machismo in their country.

Dozens of women painted on a protective barricade around the Angel of Independence monument on the city’s main avenue Sunday while others crocheted purple and pink hearts to string up. The wall was erected after feminists used paint to deface the monument with graffiti in August to decry alleged rapes by police in the capital as well as high rates of murders of women throughout the country.

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Vogue cover spotlights Mexico’s transgender ‘muxe’ women

art close up color conceptual
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11/20/19 – Reuters

By Jose de Jesus Cortes, David Alire Garcia

A culture of indigenous transgender women that has been part of southern Mexico’s heritage for centuries is primed for global fashion cachet thanks to one of the world’s top style magazines.

For the first time in Vogue magazine’s more than 120 years of publishing, an indigenous “muxe” will appear next month on the cover of the glossy’s Mexican and British editions.

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Day of the Dead parade hits Mexico City as holiday expands

photo of woman wearing traditional dress
Photo by Genaro Servín on Pexels.com

10/29/19 – AP News

By Amy Guthrie

Thousands of Mexicans took to the streets of the capital to dance beside giant skulls and skeletons Sunday as Mexico City rolled out its fourth edition of a Day of the Dead parade inspired by Hollywood, part of an ever-expanding menu of festivities for the holiday.

The city once again borrowed props from the opening scene of the 2015 James Bond film, “Spectre,” in which Daniel Craig’s title character dons a skull mask as he makes his way through a crowd of revelers. Festivities in the capital have expanded in recent years to capitalize on growing interest in the holiday, with temporary art installations in public spaces and colorful weekend events. Yet another elaborate parade is scheduled to traverse the city’s iconic Reforma boulevard on Nov. 2, All Souls Day.

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AMLO, the World Series-watching president, wants to Make Mexican Baseball Great Again

white baseball ball on brown leather baseball mitt
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10/24/19 – The Washington Post

By Mary Beth Sheridan

It was another grim news conference for Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. There was a narco crisis in Sinaloa. A clash with protesters in the capital. And now, a new threat from Washington.

 

His name was Juan Soto, and he was sticking it to the president’s team, the Astros.

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Mexico Fashion Week: Showcasing the work of contemporary designers and traditional artisans

selective focus photography of woman holding floral hairpiece
Photo by Davis Sanchez on Pexels.com

10/25/19 – CNN

By Kristen Bateman
It’s easy to see why contemporary designers seek to evoke traditional Mexican handcrafts and folk art through their collections.
Brightly-colored embroidery and intricate beading reflect skills passed down for generations, while the patterns themselves carry meaning far beyond modern print design.

The Dance Halls of Mexico City Show Off a Different Side of the City

 

man and woman dancing in prom apparel near man singing
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

10/14/19 – Conde Nast Traveler

By Megan Spurrell

From the moment I stepped into Salon Los Angeles, a cavernous pink auditorium decked out in shimmering streamers and neon Art Deco signage, thrumming with a crowd that could really move, I knew I had come to the right place. The energy filled the out-of-the-way Guerrero dance hall like helium in a balloon, expanding with the buena onda of people spinning and smiling. I watched a middle-aged man in a bright red zoot suit step onto the floor, a long peasant feather stuck into his hat, wingtip shoes shuffling to the beat, and I knew this was more than a place to dance—this was a scene.

Salon Los Angeles opened its doors in 1937, and it’s been a mainstay dance hall for a tight-knit community since. In fact, it’s the oldest dance hall in all of Mexico City, and through the ebbs and flows of musical trends, it has remained a place to tap your hand-stitched oxford shoes to the clap of claves, catch world-famous bands, and mingle with others who love to dance. While the club has long catered to a steady set of regulars and serious dancers, a new wave of younger Mexicans—and travelers with an ear to the ground—are stepping onto the dance floor.

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Mexico City’s secret underground world

10/14/19 – BBC Travel

By Susannah Rigg

As we descended 7m below Mexico City’s Metropolitan Cathedral, I could feel my heart race. I had heard whisperings about the temples buried under this iconic cathedral – one of the largest and oldest in Latin America ­– but since their discovery in the 1970s, it had not been possible to see them. Now, I was part of a public tour that lets visitors explore the ancient secrets that lie just below this church’s depths.

Nearly 500 years after Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés toppled the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán, the remains of the ancient metropolis continue to lay hidden mere metres under modern-day Mexico City. The Spanish started building the Metropolitan Cathedral in 1573 above the sacred Aztec (or as they called themselves, “Mexica”) temples as a symbol of their conquest.

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