America Can Compete Successfully

1/23/2017 Medium

By Earl Anthony Wayne, Public Policy Fellow & Advisory Board Member, Mexico Institute

Much national debate over the last year has been about how the United States, its companies and its workers can compete successfully in the world. The theme was clear in President Trump’s inaugural speech. And, most observers agree that America has what it takes to succeed, but it needs to deploy an array of improved policies and tools to face global competition. We must draw on the best ideas from across the political spectrum and agree on a comprehensive strategy.

Some seek to push ahead aggressively on select reforms without trying to build a broader coalition. Yet there is clear potential for President Trump and his allies to forge wider agreement around an ambitious agenda for making the United States more competitive globally. Agreements that cross party lines would make it more likely that the programs America needs to excel in global markets are enacted, funded and well implemented.

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Despite fears, Mexico’s manufacturing boom is lifting U.S. workers

08/21/2016 Los Angeles Times

ensamblaje.jpgEnrique Zarate, 19, had spent just a year in college when he landed an apprenticeship at a new BMW facility in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. If he performs well, in a year he’ll win a well-paid position, with benefits, working with robots at the company’s newest plant.

Within a decade or so, most of the BMW 3 series cars that Americans buy will probably come from Mexico, built by people like Zarate.

“When you start with such little experience, and get such a big salary, it’s unbelievable,” says Zarate, whose father is a taxi driver and whose mother is a housewife.

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Mexico Sitting on Untapped Entrepreneurial Talent

07/20/2016 Gallup

emprender.pngWASHINGTON, D.C. — Entrepreneurial talent — an individual’s innate potential to successfully create businesses and jobs — can be found in every postal code in Mexico. But many of these individuals are not being identified and developed.

Just over one in four adults living in Mexico are employed full time for an employer, which is about average for Latin America, but it highlights a disappointing gap between the current state of Mexico’s economy and its potential. The lack of “good jobs” could stem from the sizable informal economy, uncompetitive wages and sparse access to training, development and higher education.

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BBVA selects 56 startups to compete in Open Talent innovation contest

08/08/2016 Finextra

startupsThe finalists of the 8th edition of the BBVA Open Talent contest were announced today. They will compete in three separate finals in Mexico, London and New York in September.

Startup Musoni and its microfinance solution won the BBVA Open Talent 2016 special Financial Award. Musoni has developed a system that leverages technology to help financial institutions optimize their microfinance services, boost efficiency, improve cost-effectiveness and broaden their reach in rural areas where most of the population remains unbanked.

Mexico has a master plan to increase its competitiveness through greater connectivity: Enrique Peña Nieto

07/22/2016 Gob.mx

Mexico Bricks57 of the 80 federal highways, with a length of 2,000 kilometers, have been modernized or expanded, and inaugurated.

  • Road works do not arise spontaneously; they are part of a plan to define what will allow our country to continue to grow and drive its development, he said.
  • 28,000 kilometers of rural roads have been built during this administration, he said.
  • In the State of Mexico, he inaugurated the Ecatepec-Santa Clara stretch of the Mexico-Pachuca highway and the Toluca-La Marquesa stretch of the Mexico-Toluca road.
  • He celebrated his 50th birthday inaugurating infrastructure projects and meeting commitments.

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The United States and Mexico: Building and Designing Things Together

2/24/2016 The Mexico Institute, Forbes.com

By E. Anthony Wayne and Sergio M. Alcocer

forbes14,800 container trucks cross the U.S.-Mexico border each day. They carry much of the $1.6 billion in daily trade that makes Mexico the third largest economic partner and the second largest export market of the U.S., and that makes the U.S. Mexico’s top economic partner.  Mexico is the largest international buyer for some 23 U.S. states, and the U.S. buys about 80% of Mexico’s exports.  

These facts indicate why Vice President Biden, three cabinet secretaries and other U.S. officials will be in Mexico City February 25 meeting Mexican counterparts, led by Secretary of Finance Videgaray, for the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue.  Biden and others will check progress on the dozens of areas where the two governments have been working since 2013 to make it less costly and more efficient to trade between us and to build things together as we compete with other global producers.

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Mexico Institute Resources on the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue

Vice President Joe Biden and several other high-level U.S. officials are traveling to Mexico for the third meeting of the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue, which will take place in Mexico City on February 25, 2016. The U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) was created by Presidents Barack Obama and Enrique Peña Nieto in May 2013, in order to advance strategic economic and commercial priorities that are central to promoting regional economic growth, job creation, and global competitiveness for Mexico and the United States. The HLED meets annually at the cabinet level, and builds on and promotes sustained progress in a range of existing successful bilateral dialogues and working groups.

In a recent interview on NPR’s Marketplace, Director Duncan Wood suggested the meeting would address the Trans Pacific Partnership, including its potential impact on will U.S.-Mexico trade, and how lower energy prices are affecting the economies and competitiveness of the region. The Mexico Institute is pleased to share with you several recent articles regarding U.S.-Mexico economic relations published ahead of the HLED.

Related Material

The United States and Mexico: Building and Designing Things Together
In this article on Forbes.com, former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico and current Wilson Center Public Policy Fellow E. Anthony Wayne joins former Under Secretary for North America of Mexico’s Foreign Ministry and current UNAM Professor Sergio Alcocer to write about U.S.-Mexico trade and the agenda items for the High Level Economic Dialogue.

Depressed Energy Prices Cause Decline in U.S.-Mexico Trade
Deputy Director Christopher Wilson writes about the impact of low energy prices on U.S.-Mexico trade in this post on the Mexico Institute Forbes blog.

The “Bridge to Nowhere” Now Connects the United States and Mexico
On February 4, 2016, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. Secretaries of Homeland Security and Commerce inaugurated a new border crossing just south of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. Ambassador E. Anthony Wayne and Deputy Director Christopher Wilson discuss this in their op-ed on Forbes.com.

North American Needs to Pivot…to North America
In this U.S. election year, it is important to shift the conversation to the importance of U.S. relations with Mexico and Canada. This column, by the former Canadian ambassador to the U.S., the former Mexican ambassador to the U.S., and the former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, suggests that all three nations increase their focus on advancing trilateral economic relations and improve collaboration on major security issues including illegal trafficking, extremism, and terrorism. This article appeared in The World Post, The Globe and Mail, and El Universal.

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