Mexico has a master plan to increase its competitiveness through greater connectivity: Enrique Peña Nieto

07/22/2016 Gob.mx

Mexico Bricks57 of the 80 federal highways, with a length of 2,000 kilometers, have been modernized or expanded, and inaugurated.

  • Road works do not arise spontaneously; they are part of a plan to define what will allow our country to continue to grow and drive its development, he said.
  • 28,000 kilometers of rural roads have been built during this administration, he said.
  • In the State of Mexico, he inaugurated the Ecatepec-Santa Clara stretch of the Mexico-Pachuca highway and the Toluca-La Marquesa stretch of the Mexico-Toluca road.
  • He celebrated his 50th birthday inaugurating infrastructure projects and meeting commitments.

Read more…

The United States and Mexico: Building and Designing Things Together

2/24/2016 The Mexico Institute, Forbes.com

By E. Anthony Wayne and Sergio M. Alcocer

forbes14,800 container trucks cross the U.S.-Mexico border each day. They carry much of the $1.6 billion in daily trade that makes Mexico the third largest economic partner and the second largest export market of the U.S., and that makes the U.S. Mexico’s top economic partner.  Mexico is the largest international buyer for some 23 U.S. states, and the U.S. buys about 80% of Mexico’s exports.  

These facts indicate why Vice President Biden, three cabinet secretaries and other U.S. officials will be in Mexico City February 25 meeting Mexican counterparts, led by Secretary of Finance Videgaray, for the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue.  Biden and others will check progress on the dozens of areas where the two governments have been working since 2013 to make it less costly and more efficient to trade between us and to build things together as we compete with other global producers.

Read more…

Mexico Institute Resources on the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue

Vice President Joe Biden and several other high-level U.S. officials are traveling to Mexico for the third meeting of the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue, which will take place in Mexico City on February 25, 2016. The U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) was created by Presidents Barack Obama and Enrique Peña Nieto in May 2013, in order to advance strategic economic and commercial priorities that are central to promoting regional economic growth, job creation, and global competitiveness for Mexico and the United States. The HLED meets annually at the cabinet level, and builds on and promotes sustained progress in a range of existing successful bilateral dialogues and working groups.

In a recent interview on NPR’s Marketplace, Director Duncan Wood suggested the meeting would address the Trans Pacific Partnership, including its potential impact on will U.S.-Mexico trade, and how lower energy prices are affecting the economies and competitiveness of the region. The Mexico Institute is pleased to share with you several recent articles regarding U.S.-Mexico economic relations published ahead of the HLED.

Related Material

The United States and Mexico: Building and Designing Things Together
In this article on Forbes.com, former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico and current Wilson Center Public Policy Fellow E. Anthony Wayne joins former Under Secretary for North America of Mexico’s Foreign Ministry and current UNAM Professor Sergio Alcocer to write about U.S.-Mexico trade and the agenda items for the High Level Economic Dialogue.

Depressed Energy Prices Cause Decline in U.S.-Mexico Trade
Deputy Director Christopher Wilson writes about the impact of low energy prices on U.S.-Mexico trade in this post on the Mexico Institute Forbes blog.

The “Bridge to Nowhere” Now Connects the United States and Mexico
On February 4, 2016, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. Secretaries of Homeland Security and Commerce inaugurated a new border crossing just south of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. Ambassador E. Anthony Wayne and Deputy Director Christopher Wilson discuss this in their op-ed on Forbes.com.

North American Needs to Pivot…to North America
In this U.S. election year, it is important to shift the conversation to the importance of U.S. relations with Mexico and Canada. This column, by the former Canadian ambassador to the U.S., the former Mexican ambassador to the U.S., and the former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, suggests that all three nations increase their focus on advancing trilateral economic relations and improve collaboration on major security issues including illegal trafficking, extremism, and terrorism. This article appeared in The World Post, The Globe and Mail, and El Universal.

How To Make Mexico More Competitive: More Corporate Ethics & State Efficiency, Less Corruption

10/21/2015 Mexico Institute-Forbes Blog

By Viridiana Rios

Between 2013 and 2014, Mexico approved historically needed reforms to increase competition, strengthen financial markets, reduce energy costs, improve the quality of education, and make labor markets more flexible.

Yet, according to the figures published just last week by the World Economic Forum (WEF), the country’s competitiveness ranking remains the same as it was a decade ago. Despite Congressional approval of the structural reforms that analysts and observers have demanded for years, there has been little evidence that Mexico is significantly more competitive than it was in 2005.

Read more…

Nissan In Mexico: Japanese Automaker Exports 5 Millionth Car From Its Mexican Manufacturing Base

8/18/2015 International Business Times

To give you a sense of just how fast Mexico is becoming a major automotive manufacturing hub, consider this: For its first three decades of sending its Mexican-made cars abroad, Nissan exported roughly 33,000 cars and trucks every year. But since 2002, that number has topped 307,000 units annually, a nearly tenfold average annual increase.

On Monday, Nissan announced that a red NP300 pickup truck became its 5 millionth Mexican-made export since the Japanese automaker began sending its vehicles from Mexico to the United States in 1972. That’s up from 4 million in 2013, which means the export pace has accelerated to about a half-million cars annually in the past two years.

Read more…

New Publication | A Mandate for Mexico

By Lucy Conger

mandate for mexicoIt was not so long ago that Mexico teetered on the brink of bankruptcy following a short-lived oil boom and a wild run of government spending. And, until quite recently, Mexico, despite sharing a 2,000-mile border with the United States, kept foreign goods out and gave domestic industries nearly exclusive access to a country-sized captive market.

Free trade has made Mexico a powerful manufacturing platform, a top global automobile assembler, and has radically diversified the economy, sharply reducing dependence on oil exports. The paradigm shift that unfettered Mexico’s protected and closed economy has been highly successful in creating a stable economic and policy environment and in making Mexico a marketfriendly global super-trader. But formidable challenges remain. Economic growth has slowed and consistently falls short of the level needed to create enough jobs to absorb the expanding domestic labor force.

Mexico is at a critical juncture. The record shows that the first wave of reforms that began 30 years ago failed to deliver the desired boost to economic growth and competitiveness. The reforms now underway promise even bigger changes for the economy, particularly by opening up the long closed petroleum industry. Looking ahead, can the new wave of reforms move Mexico into a higher gear, stimulate increases in productivity and economic growth, lubricate the economy with more credit, establish and enforce genuine competition in strategic sectors, and train the work force in modern skills? Or, three decades hence will we look back and say the Peña Nieto reforms were inadequately implemented and Mexico remains a low-growth, low-productivity economy?

This is a timely moment for reviewing Mexico’s success with deep economic reforms and asking what is required from here on in to make the new wave of reforms successful so that Mexico and Mexicans can enjoy the benefits of higher growth and productivity. This study offers a qualitative analysis of the deep economic reforms undertaken in Mexico during the past 30 years, the progress made and informed opinions on what is needed today to boost economic growth, enhance competitiveness and, hopefully, increase employment. The study summarizes the views about the successes and failures of the first wave of reforms as seen by a select group of former cabinet members and other prominent policy makers, consultants to government, opinion shapers in policy centers, and thought leaders in academia.

Download the report here.

EVENT THIS AFTERNOON: NAFTA & the Strengthening of the Mexican Economy

120px-North_America_(orthographic_projection).svgWHEN: TODAY, June 29, 2:00-3:30pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Click here to RSVP.

A live webcast will be available here.

Two decades ago, Canada, Mexico, and the United States created a continental economy. Since the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexico has lived through a currency crisis, a democratic transition, and the rising challenge of Asian manufacturing. Many of the dynamics of North America today, from Mexico’s reform agenda to continental concerns about competitiveness, have their roots in the conditions that produced NAFTA, in the agreement itself, and in the tremendous transformations it wrought. Looking back at that period provides context for understanding today’s reforms. Today, Mexico’s competitiveness agenda, championed by President Enrique Peña Nieto and widely supported by the Mexican Congress, includes specific actions oriented toward promoting larger inflows of foreign investment by opening strategic economic sectors to private participation. This package of reforms would bring a sweeping transformation of the economy.

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to an event on NAFTA and the Mexican economy. Jaime Serra Puche will present his book NAFTA and the Building of a Region. An Essay from the Mexican Perspective and Lucy Conger will present her paper on Mexican competitiveness, A Mandate for Mexico. Ambassador Carla A. Hills will provide commentary on both publications, in relation to the broader subjects of NAFTA and the Mexican economy.

Speakers

Jaime Serra Puche
Chairman, SAI Law and Economics

Ambassador Carla A. Hills
Chair and CEO, Hills & Company, International Consultants

Lucy Conger
Independent Journalist

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

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