Migrant protesters occupy U.S.-Mexico border bridge, close crossing

asylum_tijuana_caravan_1222

10/10/19 – Reuters

By Veronica G. Cardenas

U .S. asylum seekers camped out in a dangerous Mexican border town occupied a bridge to Brownsville, Texas on Thursday, leading to the closure of the crossing, witnesses and authorities said.

Hundreds of the migrants have been camped for weeks on the end of the bridge in Matamoros, Mexico, a city known for cartel control of people trafficking and gang violence.

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Guns from the United States are stoking a homicide epidemic in Mexico

Guns by Flickr user barjack

10/06/19 – LA Times

By Kate Linthicum

The sun had not yet risen when dozens of gunmen stormed into the town of Ocotito in southern Mexico and started shooting.

Salvador Alanis Trujillo tried to fight back, but his shotgun was no match for their assault rifles. So he and his family fled.

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Mexican president trades barbs with business, civic groups

amlo

09/25/19 – AP News

By Mark Stevenson

Mexico’s president engaged in a war of words Wednesday with business and civic groups that have lodged legal challenges to one of his pet projects.

The groups were angered when Andrés Manuel López Obrador abandoned the previous administration’s partly built airport on a former lakebed, claiming the project was drenched in corruption and cost too much.

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A Year After Deadly Mexico Quake, Some Still Wait to Return Home

09/19/2018 – The New York Times

adult-architecture-black-and-white-735833.jpgA year after a devastating earthquake struck Mexico City and killed dozens of people, Guadalupe Padilla is still waiting to return to her home.

The 60-year-old security guard has lived in a wooden shack in a park facing the now-empty apartment block where she spent three decades of her life.

Padilla is one of hundreds of people in the capital who have been unable to return to their homes, according to Reuters interviews with over a dozen people left homeless by the quake.

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Corruption in Mexico

06/19/18 The New York Times

corruptionTo the Editor:

Re “Criminal Cases in Graft Scandal Stifled in Mexico” (front page, June 11):

It comes as no surprise that although Mexico’s government has evidence to charge officials connected to one of the biggest corruption scandals in Latin American history, it is refusing to bring charges because they might hurt the governing party ahead of presidential elections. That’s the way things have worked in Mexico for decades.

What’s new is the growing power and determination of civil society to document abuses and push for change.

Last month, my organization joined with eight Mexican NGOs to reveal widespread collusion between public officials and drug cartels, resulting in massacres, forced disappearances, torture and other brutal violence.

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What Ails Mexican Democracy

03/22/2018 Foreign Affairs

Mexico CityMillions of Mexican citizens will go to the polls on July 1 to elect a new president, just as they have done, like clockwork, every six years since 1934. If experience is any guide, the election will proceed without incident: polls will open on time, observers will pronounce the voting to have been “free and fair,” and the losers will congratulate the winner, even if they also pledge to “continue the fight.” But all is not well with Mexican democracy. Public support for democratic institutions is low, and faith in the democratic process is waning. The current president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has logged some of the worst public approval ratings ever recorded in Mexico—as low as 12 percent, according to one poll from January 2017. His administration is widely blamed for failing to solve Mexico’s most vexing problems: civil-war-like levels of violence, high crime rates, blatant corruption and impunity at the highest levels of government, a continuously impoverished countryside, and a long-term failure to extend the provision of public goods across the whole of Mexican territory.

What is to be done?

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UPCOMING EVENT | What Do Mexicans Think About the U.S. and the World? Results from Mexico, the Americas, and the World 2014-2015

globe north south americaWHEN: Tuesday, May 31, 2016, 3:00-5:00pm

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our event “What Do Mexicans Think About the U.S. and the World? Results from Mexico, the Americas, and the World 2014-2015.” Mexico, the Americas, and the World is a public opinion research project undertaken by the Division of International Studies at the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE) in Mexico City. The survey, carried out biannually in Mexico since 2004 (and elsewhere in Latin American since 2008), seeks to understand Mexicans’ and Latin Americans’ views on foreign policy and international relations—in a word, on their place in the world. The 2014-2015 edition finds that, among other things, fewer Mexicans report having family members that live abroad and receiving remittances. Despite the rise of anti-immigration sentiment in the U.S., Mexicans’ evaluations of “Colossus to the North” have continued to rise since 2010—apparently an “Obama effect.” Finally, faced with a grave human rights crisis, Mexicans are willing to accept supervision on rights from the UN, OAS, and even—to some extent—from the United States. Two researchers from CIDE will present and discuss the report’s findings.

Speakers
Gerardo Maldonado
Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE)

David Crow
Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE)

Moderator
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

Mexico’s Ruling Party Cries ‘Witch Hunt’ at Landmark Anti-Corruption Bill

4/26/16 VICE News

maxresdefaultA grassroots proposal for a new law designed to make it harder for Mexican officials to hide ill-gotten gains has garnered unprecedented public support at a time when corruption and conflict of interest allegations buzz around both the government and their political rivals.

The bill, however, now appears on the point of being blocked from becoming law by the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, and its allies in the senate.

Drawn up by lawyers, academics, and high-profile transparency activists and organizations, the citizen’s bill was designed to be included in the package of laws governing the implementation of the much-touted National Anti-Corruption System, which was approved last year.

“This was a real landmark for civil society in Mexico, actually drafting a bill and gaining enough signatures for it to reach the senate floor,” said Edna Jaime, director of the think-tank México Evalúa and one of the activists behind the initiative.

The proposal is called the Ley3de3, or the three-out-of-three law, because it would oblige all holders of public office to upload proof of their personal assets, tax returns, and potential conflicts of interest onto a national database that is already up and running. It also lays out formal channels for citizens to denounce corruption and recommends sanctions for those officials found guilty.

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UPCOMING EVENT | Mexican Civil Society’s Battle Against Corruption: #Ley3de3

maxresdefaultWHEN: Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 9:00-10:30 AM

WHERE: 6th Floor Board Room, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

The Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to our event “Mexican Civil Society’s Battle Against Corruption: #Ley3de3.” Prominent members of Mexican civil society will discuss the mechanisms being pursued to create a proper legal framework to fight corruption in Mexico. In particular, they will discuss the current status and challenges of a “citizen initiative” known as #Ley3de3, which is currently being discussed in the Mexican Congress. This initiative represents the first time in Mexico’s history that civil society has come together to take legislative processes against corruption into their own hands. #Ley3de3 was broadly backed by civil society (more than 600 thousand signatures in favor of it) but is currently frozen in Congress due to lack of agreement between political parties.

For more information on Ley3de3, visit www.ley3de3.mx.

Speakers
Eduardo Bohórquez
Director, Transparencia Mexicana

Juan Pardinas
Director, Instituto Mexicano para la Competitividad (IMCO)

Commentator
Viridiana Rios
Global Fellow, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Moderator
Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center

Click to RSVP

Mexico’s victims’ movement will continue to exert pressure – #MexFacts

victims movement - villagran flyer

“Mexico’s victims’ movement will continue to exert critical pressure for transforming the system into one that respects victims’ rights, addresses the social and economic roots of crime, promotes the rule of law, and ensures justice.” – Lauren Villagran, “The Victims’ Movement in Mexico”

Read the full report here.