Juárez is largest producer of solar panels in Mexico

07/27/15 El Paso Times

Solar PanelsJUAREZ >> This border city has become the largest producer of solar panels in Mexico and Latin America, officials said.

The manufacturing plant Flextronics, located in far south Juárez, recently reached its maximum capacity production of 1.3 million solar panels a year. It began making them for Missouri-based SunEdison Inc., the world’s largest renewable energy development company, in mid-2014.

The panels, which were produced for the first time in Juárez, are exported to the United States and other countries in South America and Europe for residential, utility and commercial photovoltaic projects.

A photovoltaic system employs solar panels, also known as modules, to supply usable solar power.

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2015 United States -Mexico Summit: A View from the Border

On August 6-8 in El Paso/Ciudad Juarez for the United States-Mexico Summit: A View from the Border and International 10K race.

To join the 2015 USMXS, please visit:


And to learn more about the U.S.-Mexico 10k:


At An Asylum In Juarez, ‘We Believe In Hope’

07/06/15 NPR

map_ciudad_juarez11Fifteen miles past the city limits of Juarez, an insane asylum serves as the last stop for a group of indigent and mentally ill people. It’s called Vision en Accion, or Vision in Action, and it sits like a citadel in a filthy desert dotted with dumps and junkyards, in an area haunted by years of violence from the drug cartel wars that claimed more than 11,000 lives. A few of the asylum’s 120 residents live behind bars in tiny, solitary cement cells. You can hear them moaning or screaming at times. But most of the people here spend their time doing chores and relaxing in an open courtyard. They’re tended to by the evangelist pastor who built the shelter, Jose Antonio Galvan.

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Mexican Police Capture Leader of Juárez Cartel

4/19/2015 New York Times

handcuffsMexican officials said Sunday that they had captured a leader of the Juárez Cartel, Jesús Salas Aguayo, the man in charge of the gang’s operations in Ciudad Juárez during a convulsion of violence that made the city one of the world’s most murderous.

Mr. Salas, 38, was arrested Friday in the town of Villa Ahumada, about 80 miles south of the Texas border, Mexico’s national security commissioner told reporters Sunday. Mr. Salas took over the cartel’s leadership this year after the arrests of its boss, Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, last October and his replacement, David Aaron Espinoza Haro, in January, the commissioner said.

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In Mexico, Ciudad Juarez reemerging from grip of violence

cuidad juarezLA Times, 5/4/14

Angel Corral is in many ways the new face of a city long known for its criminal gangsters and one of the world’s highest homicide rates. At 29, with pale green eyes and a can-do spirit, Corral is riding Ciudad Juarez’s return to life, running three nightclubs and investing in a gym. Where all his money comes from is not exactly clear, but no one seems to be asking questions.

The reasons for the border town’s revival are also unclear, and the uplift could well prove short-lived. But there is no question that homicides have declined precipitously and that shuttered businesses are reopening. As the city climbs out of the depths of despair, Corral and a host of other residents — including returning exiles — are jumping aboard.

Just a couple of years ago, Gomez Morin Boulevard, at the commercial heart of Juarez, had become a ghost town, like much of the city just across the Rio Grande from El Paso. Drug, extortion and kidnapping gangs ran amok, fighting turf wars and terrorizing rich and poor. Today, much of the city, including the boulevard where the bar is located, is bustling, replete with signs saying “Now open” outside restaurants, casinos, spas and yoga studios.

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Todos Somos Juarez: An Innovative Strategy to Tackle Violence and Crime

Ciudad JuárezLatin American Policy Journal, 2013

In the last few years, Mexico has been living a very complex public security situation. For decades, criminal organizations were allowed to grow and gain strength, which seriously affected the lives of ordinary citizens in towns and cities across Mexico. But in few parts of the country had the situation reached such dramatic levels as in Ciudad Juarez. Crime and violence here grew systematically, due to three main factors: First, the expansion of criminal organizations as they diversified their main line of business from exporting illegal drugs to the U.S. to retail sales of drugs in Mexico. Second, was the weakness of local law enforcement agencies and third, a serious weakening of the social fabric.
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Ciudad Juárez, a Border City Known for Killing, Gets Back to Living

The New York Times, 12/14/2013

cuidad juarezWith violence down to a quarter of its peak, Ciudad Juárez, a perennial symbol of drug war devastation, is experiencing what many here describe as a boom. New restaurants pop up weekly, a few with a hipster groove. Schools and homes in some neighborhoods are gradually filling again, while new nightclubs throb on weekends with wall-to-wall teenagers and 20-somethings who insist on reclaiming the freedom to work and play without being consumed by worry.

Critics here fear that the changes are merely cosmetic, and there is still disagreement over what, exactly, has led to the drastic drop in violence. Some attribute it to an aggressive detention policy by the police; others say the worst killers have died or fled, or that the Sinaloa drug cartel has simply defeated its rivals, leaving a peace of sorts that could quickly be undone.

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