Addressing Global Energy Demand in North America

January 23, 2015

1/22/2015 The Wagner Review

By Maria Landa, Former Mexico Institute Intern

environment - energy - light bulb with paddy riceBy 2030, global energy demand will increase by 41 percent due to rapid population and economic growth. Between 2012 and 2035, global population is projected to grow by 1.7 billion and real (or inflation-adjusted) income will more than double. In order to promote more energy efficient activities that curb greenhouse gas emissions and slow growth related to demand, both developed and emerging economies have placed environment and climate policies high on their political agendas. Yet, the latest scenario by the International Energy Agency World Energy Outlook estimates that in 2040, oil and gas will remain the backbone of energy supply, making up nearly half of the total energy supply – with the remainder coming from coal and low-carbon fuels.

Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. will play critical roles in meeting the demand, tackling pressure on the global energy system, and contributing to energy security. With the abundance of U.S. natural gas and oil reserves, Canada’s oil sands and Mexico’s landmark constitutional energy reform (which opened its energy sector to private investment for the first time), North America is now considered an energy superpower. Leading think tanks and political leaders are urging the U.S. not only to strengthen ties with its North American neighbors, but also to make the trilateral relationship a priority in U.S. policy. The Council on Foreign Relations recently released a report led by former CIA Director David Petraeus and former World Bank president, Robert Zoellick, indicating that increased production and innovation in the energy sector coupled with China’s labor and shipping costs, boost North America’s global competitive advantage.

Read more…


Harper Postpones Three Amigos Summit Amid Chilly Relations with U.S. and Mexico

January 16, 2015

1/15/2015 The Globe and Mail

NAFTAPrime Minister Stephen Harper has postponed the North American leaders’ summit with U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto at a time when relations with both leaders are chilly.

The unexpected move allows Mr. Harper to avoid an awkward side-by-side news conference with Mr. Obama at a February summit that all three governments were expecting would be dominated by the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline – now at the top of the political agenda in Washington.


Mexico Feels Heat of Canada Crude; Price Advantage Narrows

January 14, 2015

By Robert Tuttle, 1/13/2015

532687354_fdef042d72_zHeavy Canadian crude sold at the smallest discount to Maya in four years as new pipeline and rail capacity allowed record volumes to flow south and compete with imports shipped in from the Gulf of Mexico.

Western Canadian Select traded at $33.29 a barrel today, a $4.61 a barrel discount to the similar Mexican crude, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That was the smallest differential since December 2010.

U.S. crude imports from Canada rose to 3.26 million barrels a day in the week ended Jan. 2, Energy Department data show. The increase came as new pipelines including Enbridge Inc. (ENB)’s Flanagan South and Seaway Twin pipelines ramped up.

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Confronting Challenges to North America’s Energy Future

December 12, 2014

12/12/2014 Duncan Wood and Rachel Bronson via Forbes.com

stock-footage-montage-of-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-pollutionNorth America is fast becoming the epicenter of a transformation in global energy. Canada, Mexico and the United States are bringing to market huge new energy resources that were too expensive or politically risky to exploit until recently.  According to the Energy Information Administration, North American oil and gas growth is expected to exceed all of OPEC’s over the next decade.

But despite North America’s huge energy potential, the United States, Mexico, and Canada all face serious obstacles in getting their energy resources to market. Skills gaps and low public support for energy infrastructure stand in the way of a potentially rich North American energy future. As the three North American energy ministers prepare to meet in Washington on December 15th, they must develop innovative policy solutions to overcome these barriers and create the necessary support structure to fully realize North America’s emerging energy boom.

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Take Mexico off the ‘safe list,’ immigration protesters urge

November 20, 2014

11/19/14 Leader Post

canada mexicoRaul Gatica Bautista fled Mexico for Canada in 2005 with a bullet wound in his stomach and scarring on his face, grim testaments to the abuse the indigenous rights activist says he suffered at the hands of the Mexican police. Canada accepted him as a refugee then, but Gatica Bautista says this country would turn him away today because of changes last year that placed Mexico on a list of 42 countries deemed safe by the federal government. Asylum seekers from these countries have fewer appeal options and are deported faster than refugee claimants from other countries. On Wednesday, Gatica-Bautista and groups of protesters in several cities called on the federal government to take Mexico off the so-called “safe list,” citing the recent disappearance and possible massacre of 43 teaching students in rural Mexico and the ongoing persecution of indigenous rights activists. The group No One is Illegal has launched a similar petition.

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Prospects for Improving Canada’s Relations with Mexico

October 6, 2014

9/25/14 Hudson Institute

NAFTAChristopher Sands, Senior Fellow of the Hudson Institute testified in from of the Senate of Canada Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade where he addresses why the Canadian relationship with Mexico matters to all three NAFTA countries.

To read his testimony please click here.

 

 


Now for the Hard Part: Renewing Regional Cooperation on Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience

September 23, 2014

09/22/14 Mexico Institute, Canada Institute and the Canadian International Council

wc_vert_colorCritical infrastructure security and resilience (CISR) has been one of the core priorities for North American regional security cooperation since 9/11. More than a dozen years later, extensive consultation within and between the United States, Canada, and Mexico has finally begun to generate some tangible results, including ongoing information-sharing, the development of cross-border emergency response procedures, and joint exercises. These have been touted by some as signs of meaningful progress, but the nature of the results says more about the weakeness of the regional effort than its strength.

To read the report…


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