After the Storm in U.S.-Mexico Relations

3/31/2017 The Wilson Quarterly

Articles by Duncan Wood, Christopher Wilson, Andrew Selee, Eric L. Olson, Earl Anthony Wayne & Arturo Sarukhan

The relationship between Mexico and the United States is facing its most severe test in decades. Although a new tone and new ideas are needed, the economic, political, and security fundamentals matter more than ever.

Browse the full Winter 2017 issue of Wilson Quarterly here…

Leveraging the U.S.-Mexico Relationship to Strengthen Our Economies, by Christopher Wilson

A New Migration Agenda Between the United States and Mexico, by Andrew Selee

The Merida Initiative and Shared Responsibility in U.S.-Mexico Security Relations, by Eric L. Olson

U.S.-Mexico Energy and Climate Collaboration, by Duncan Wood

Toward a North American Foreign Policy Footprint, by Earl Anthony Wayne & Arturo Sarukhan

 

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NEW PUBLICATION | Towards a North American Foreign Policy Footprint

By Earl Anthony Wayne and Arturo Sarukhan

north-american-lights-lightenedEvery electoral cycle in the United States or Mexico brings the opportunity to reevaluate the relationship and explore how both nations can improve upon the bilateral agenda given changes in the regional and global context. In the coming months, it is quite likely that crucial issues in the relationship may be revisited in profound ways. This presents both real risks and real opportunities. Even as the political climate changes, the on-the-ground benefits of regional collaboration for the security and economic well-being of the United States, Mexico, and all of North America continue to be immense.

Towards a North American Foreign Policy Footprint,” was written by Earl Anthony Wayne, Career Ambassador and former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, and Arturo Sarukhan, Career Ambassador and former Mexican Ambassador to the U.S. In the policy brief, the authors review existing cooperation and explore the potential for enhanced cooperation on international issues by Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

This policy brief is the first of our series “Charting a New Course: Policy Options for the Next Stage in U.S.-Mexico Relations.”  The policy briefs will be released individually and published as a volume in the spring of 2017.

Read the publication here.

Sunnylands Tours In-Demand

Palm Springs Life, October 2012

In keeping with the Annenbergs’ foundation directive, Sunnylands has hosted three high-level retreats.

In conjunction with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, The Retreat at Sunnylands brought together former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Congresswoman and Wilson Center President/CEO Jane Harman; Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa; Mexican Ambassador to the United States Arturo Sarukhan; and other political, academic, and media leaders to discuss relations between the United States and Mexico. On July 11, Cowan presented a white paper from the three-day retreat (March 29-April 1) to key members of Congress at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.

Continue reading “Sunnylands Tours In-Demand”

U.S., Mexican Leaders Say the Old PRI is Gone

The Texas Tribune, 9/4/12

The return to power of Mexico’s Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, will not be accompanied by the corruption that used to plague the party, says Arturo Sarukhan, the Mexican ambassador to the U.S., and former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson.

At a panel hosted Tuesday by Richardson and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, and sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Center, Sarukhan wouldn’t say whether he’d stay in his post if President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto asked him. But he said the PRI and the Mexican population have shifted, and that the country’s maturing democracy would not allow anyone to “turn back the clock.”

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A Stronger Future: Policy Recommendations for U.S.-Mexico Relations

Mexico Institute, 07/11/2012

The Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands and the Wilson Center seized the opportunity provided by simultaneous election years in the United States and Mexico to convene a high-level retreat of preeminent political, business, academic, and media leaders from the two countries in March 2012. From this retreat emerged a fresh set of ideas to take the bilateral partnership to a new level that are put forth in the report, A Stronger Future: Policy Recommendations for U.S.-Mexico Relations.  The report presents recommendations to enhance regional competitiveness; reform the U.S. immigration system; more effectively fight organized crime and strengthen public security; further educational exchanges; increase energy cooperation; and develop ports of entry that strengthen trade and border security.

To download report click here.

For a video from the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands from A Stronger Future: Policy Recommendations for U.S.-Mexico Relations click here.

Mexico Confronts Bloody Present to Ensure Brighter Future

Yahoo News, 5/23/2012
Interview with Arturo Sarukhan, Mexican Ambassador to the United States, for ABC News

Last week the Zetas cartel of Mexico dumped 49 decapitated bodies on a highway about 100 miles southwest of Texas border, in the latest massacre in the ongoing fight between Mexican drug cartels.

The drug war in Mexico has claimed over 50,000 victims since 2006 and even though it’s on the border with the United States, it is one of the least reported international stories. These gangs, particularly the Zetas and the Sinaloa Cartels, have become so powerful that local governments are outmanned and outgunned- left to call in Mexican armed forces to contain the gunfights.

It’s become an impossible story to report. Since 2007, 13 journalists have been killed in Mexico and many have sought refuge in foreign countries including three who were granted asylum in the United States and Canada, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

To discuss the issue Christiane Amanpour sat down with someone on the front lines in this battle Arturo Sarukhan, the Mexican Ambassador to the United States. In an extended interview, Ambassador Sarukahn spoke candidly about the stakes of this fight, what “victory” will look like, and the important parallel future the United States and Mexico share.

Access interview on video here.

Mexico ‘Critically Important’ to U.S. Economy

CONTEXT, Woodrow Wilson Center, 2/28/2012

At a recent event, the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute introduced a new publication, Working Together: Economic Ties between the United States and Mexico. The ensuing discussion focused on two economies joined at the hip and how enhanced cooperation could result in much-needed job creation. That’s an outcome that would be welcomed on both sides of the border. To further explore the economic ties that bind the two North American neighbors, we spoke with former United States Trade Representative, Carla Hills, and Mexican Ambassador to the United States, Arturo Sarukhan.

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