Trump’s new NAFTA has hard fight in Congress while steel tariffs remain

12/06/2018 – Politico

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo

By Sabrina Rodriguez

President Donald Trump just celebrated the signing of a new North American trade pact with Canada and Mexico, but he faces a huge roadblock in Congressover U.S. tariffs that are still in place on steel and aluminum imports from the two U.S. neighbors.

The two nations are still working to negotiate a deal with the Trump administration so that they can be exempt from the duties. In the meantime, American industries will continue to be hurt by Mexico and Canada’s retaliatory duties on more than $15 billion worth of U.S. goods.

“If you’re trying to whip votes, you’d take advantage of the opportunity to lift that instead of leaving an irritant on the table,” a former U.S. Trade Representative official told POLITICO. “It’s going to make [administration officials’] lives harder to get Congress on board as constituents are complaining a lot” about the harm of the ongoing tariffs.

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Mnuchin urges Congress to pass Trump’s new NAFTA without changes

12/04/2018 – The Hill

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Copyrights: World Economic Forum

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Tuesday dismissed bipartisan criticism of the Trump administration’s renegotiated North American trade pact and urged Congress to pass the deal without changes.

Mnuchin told Fox Business Network that President Trump expects Congress to approve an updated version of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) as written and would terminate the original deal if lawmakers refuse.

“This is a great deal and there’s people who will want to make this a political issue,” Mnuchin said Tuesday. “People who think they can micromanage the deal for political reasons because they don’t want to support the president, you know that’s a bad strategy.”

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Tariff tensions shadow US, Canada, Mexico trade pact signing

11/30/2018 – Washington Post

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Photo: Martin Mejia/Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — President Donald Trump teamed up with the leaders of Canada and Mexico on Friday to sign a revised North American trade pact, a deal that fulfills a key political pledge by the American president but faces an uncertain future in the U.S. Congress. The celebratory moment was dimmed by ongoing differences over Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs, as well as plans for massive layoffs in the U.S. and Canada by General Motors.

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement is meant to replace the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement, which Trump has long denigrated as a “disaster.”

Trump appeared with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and outgoing Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto at the Group of 20 nations summit in Buenos Aires for the formal signing ceremony. Each country’s legislature must also approve the agreement.

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The Latest: Trump Praises Outgoing Mexican President

11/30/2018 – New York Times

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — The Latest on President Donald Trump at the Group of 20 summit (all times local):

10:50 a.m.

President Donald Trump is praising Mexico’s outgoing President Enrique Pena Nieto, whose government has been a target of Trump’s ire over trade, migration and Trump’s proposed wall on the U.S. southern border.

Trump has railed about factory jobs lost to Mexico and the U.S. trade deficit with its southern neighbor — two hot-button issues that vexed relations with Nieto.

But on Friday, Trump lauded Pena Nieto as a “special man.”

Trump congratulated Pena Nieto on ending his presidency by signing the new agreement governing trade relations among the United States, Mexico and Canada.

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Trump Signs New Trade Deal With Neighbors After Acrimonious Negotiations

11/30/2018 – New York Times

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Photo: Tom Brenner for The New York Times

BUENOS AIRES — President Trump and his Mexican and Canadian counterparts sought to put the acrimony of the past two years behind them on Friday as they signed a new agreement governing hundreds of billions of dollars in trade among the neighbors that underpins their economies.

Meeting for the first time since the revised North American Free Trade Agreement was sealed, Mr. Trump, President Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hailed the results as a boon for workers, businesses and the environment, even as they alluded to the harsh talks that had preceded this day.

“We worked hard on this agreement,” Mr. Trump said, with the other leaders on other side of him at a ceremony held on the sidelines of an international summit meeting in Buenos Aires. “It’s been long and hard. We’ve taken a lot of barbs and a little abuse, and we got there. It’s great for all of our countries.”

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On eve of signing, North America trade pact still being finalized

11/29/2018 – Reuters

OTTAWA (Reuters) – A day before Canada, the United States and Mexico are due to sign a new trade pact, negotiators are still thrashing out what exactly they will be putting their names to, officials said on Thursday.

The three countries agreed a deal in principle to govern the trillion dollars of mutual trade after a year and a half of contentious talks concluded with a late-night bargain just an hour before a deadline on Sept. 30.

Yet, amid squabbling between the United States and Canada, the details of the deal are still being worked on, less than a day before the scheduled Nov. 30 signing date on the sidelines of the Group of 20 world leaders summit in Buenos Aires.

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Future Mexican Minister: Trade Deal Could Be Signed at G20

11/27/2018 – The New York Times

23-julio-2018.-AMLO-Conferencia-06-1024x683.jpgBy the Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — The man tapped to head Mexico’s finance ministry after Dec. 1 says officials are expected to sign a revamped trade agreement with the United States and Canada at the Group of 20 summit in Argentina this week.

Carlos Urzua said late Monday that “all possibilities” point to a signing in Argentina.

He said the pact would then have to be ratified by the legislatures in all three countries.

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