High Demand for Bilingual Schoolteachers Has Educators Crossing U.S.-Mexico Border

10/3/16 Fox News Latino

When 36-year-old Jan García from Monterrey, Mexico, went to study for a bachelor’s degree in education in Minnesota 15 years ago, she quickly realized that her professional future lay in the classroom.Yet her dream of teaching English to elementary school children in Mexico was complicated by the country’s highly-politicized public education system which refused to recognize her qualification.

Now, however, García sees a new route to fulfilling her dream. She is currently planning to study her master’s degree in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL) at a U.S. university and pay her way by teaching in the public school system where demand for Spanish-speaking educators is growing.

Nearly half a million U.S. citizens are enrolled in Mexican schools. Many of them are struggling

09/14/16 Los Angeles Times

4016878387_6c06622439_oTwo decades ago, a team of U.S. and Mexican researchers descended on Dalton, Ga., to study the growing number of Mexican immigrants who had come to work in the city’s carpet mills.

Victor Zuñiga, a sociologist at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education, was interested in what the demographic shift meant for local schools, so he sat down with a teacher who told him something he couldn’t get out of his head.

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Students of war: Mexico welcomes Syrian students

09/14/16 Al Jaazera

Aguascalientes, Mexico – On a hot, bright evening in Aguascalientes – a peaceful city in central Mexico best known for its students and thriving car industry – Hazem Sharif and Zain Ali strolled through the leafy shade of the bar district.

Small crowds of young people from the city’s universities had begun to gather around pizzas and craft beers, excitement in the air as they awaited the start of the Argentina-USA football game.

The two young men had other things on their minds, however.

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Mexico’s Striking Teachers Stand Firm Against State Repression

08/25/16 The Nation

Oaxaca—Since the killing of 11 demonstrators at a street blockade in the Oaxacan town of Nochixtlán on June 19, Mexico has been in an uproar over the use of force against teachers resisting corporate education reform. As the Mexican school year is starting, teachers and supporters in four states have refused to return to classes until there is a negotiated agreement to change the government’s program, and until the perpetrators of the Nochixtlán massacre are held responsible.

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This Week in Latin America: Mexico’s Union Trouble

08/22/2016 Americas Quarterly

education - classroomEducation Reform in Mexico: The CNTE teachers’ union says it will not return to classes today for the start of the new school year. Union members have for months been protesting an education reform package that would require teacher evaluations and curtail the practice of members purchasing or inheriting teaching positions. The CNTE says the reform is unfairly weighted against teachers in rural areas, and have called on the government to meet a list of demands to alter the proposed laws. The teachers’ strike will be most widespread in the restive states of Guerrero, Michoacán, Oaxaca, and Chiapas, where the CNTE exerts considerable power over local politics and recent demonstrations against the reforms have led to violent clashes with police.

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Mexico president Enrique Peña Nieto plagiarized thesis for law degree: report

08/22/16 The Guardian

PenaNieto.jpgPresident Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico heavily plagiarized the thesis for his law degree, according to an investigation by a local news outlet.

Aristegui Noticias on Sunday published an online report based on an analysis of the embattled president’s thesis by a group of academics, which it said was then corroborated by the news outlet.

It said 29% of the thesis was material lifted from other works, including 20 paragraphs copied word-for-word from a book written by former president Miguel de la Madrid without citation or mention in the bibliography.

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Child labour in Mexico

08/20/16 Al Jazeera

education - school children“Education for everyone” has been a popular slogan since the Mexican revolution over 100 years ago.

But according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, eight out of 100 Mexican children who enroll in elementary school, do not show up for classes.

While barely 50 complete middle school, 20 graduate from high school, 13 get a bachelor’s degree, and only two become graduate students.

A study released by UNESCO last year says the children who don’t attend school are mostly working. The report reveals that at least 21 percent of all Mexican youth between the ages of seven and 14 drop out of school – that’s around 651,000 children.

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