Mexico judge rules arrest of alleged cartel boss was illegal

02/21/2018 The Washington Post

Mexican Supreme CourtA judge in Mexico ruled Wednesday that this week’s arrest of an alleged top drug cartel boss in a city bordering Texas was illegal.

The Federal Judiciary Council said in a statement that prosecutors had sought to have the Feb. 19 arrest upheld, saying he was detained while speeding in an SUV in the northern city of Matamoros, across from Brownsville.

However his defense presented video recordings from security cameras at his house showing marines arriving at the residence, entering and extracting the suspect. They also showed marines removing the SUV from its parking spot inside the property.

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Mexican candidate: government erred in not going after arms

02/21/2018 ABC News

Mexican Finance Minister Jose Antonio Meade attends a conference marking the International Day of Family Remittances 2017 in Mexico City
Mexican Finance Minister Jose Antonio Meade attends a conference marking the International Day of Family Remittances 2017 in Mexico City, Mexico June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Ruling-party presidential candidate Jose Antonio Meade said Wednesday the Mexican government made a mistake by focusing more on seizing drugs headed for the United States than on weapons headed into Mexico.

Meade said that if he wins the July 1 election he would focus more on inspecting vehicles coming into Mexico and better training for police.

Homicides in Mexico rose by 27 percent between 2016 and 2017. Its homicide rate was 20.5 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2017, compared to 19.4 in 2011, the peak year of Mexico’s drug war. Most of those killings involved guns, many smuggled in from the United States.

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Mexico cartel holds two special agents hostage

02/12/2018 BBC News

mexico flagTwo members of a special investigative police force who disappeared in Mexico a week ago have been shown in a video posted on YouTube.

The two agents from the Criminal Investigation Agency appear sitting in front of five masked men who force them at gunpoint to read a statement.

The armed men are believed to be members of the Jalisco New Generation cartel.

The cartel has been expanded rapidly and aggressively across Mexico.

Mexico’s Attorney General Raul Cervantes recently declared it the nation’s largest criminal organisation and it has been blamed for a series of attacks on Mexican security forces and public officials.

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Mexico investigates banner touting drug cartel in capital

02/07/2018 Reuters

Mexico CityMexican officials said on Wednesday they were investigating a banner in Mexico City announcing a powerful drug cartel’s arrival in the capital, long regarded as a safe haven from drug violence.

The large banner bearing the name Jalisco New Generation Cartel was spotted by local media on Tuesday hanging from an overpass in one of the city’s principal thoroughfares. The United States regards the cartel as one of Mexico’s most powerful drug gangs.

Several senators urged Mexico City officials to take action after the appearance of the banner, underscoring concern about rising crime in the capital.

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Citing potential danger, judge orders anonymous jury in ‘El Chapo’ trial

02/06/2018 Los Angeles Times

Image result for el chapo

A federal judge has ordered that the identities of jurors in the upcoming trial against drug kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman be kept secret and that the jurors be partially sequestered during court proceedings to protect their privacy and safety.

In court documents, U.S. prosecutors allege that Guzman employed sicarios, or hit men, to carry out hundreds of assaults, murders and kidnappings in order to silence potential witnesses and retaliate against those who cooperated with law enforcement.

 

In a decision released late Monday, Judge Brian M. Cogan of the Eastern District of New York ordered that the names, addresses and places of employment of prospective and selected jurors not be revealed to the prosecution, defense or the press, that jurors be transported to and from the courthouse by the U.S. Marshals Service, and that they be sequestered from the public while in the courthouse.

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Tijuana’s resurgence of homicides subject of USD policy brief

02/06/2018 – The San Diego Union-Tribune

 

Pedestrian_border_crossing_sign_Tijuana_Mexico
By Toksave

The expansion into Tijuana of a new drug trafficking group, the Cartel Nueva Generacion Jalisco, is a key factor in explaining the city’s record number of homicides in 2017, according to a paper released Monday by the Justice in Mexico project at the University of San Diego.

Citing numbers obtained from the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the study reports 1,780 homicide victims in 2017; the Baja California Attorney General’s Office has reported 1,744. In either case, Tijuana had more homicides that any other city in Mexico last year.

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UPCOMING EVENT | Los Zetas Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

9781477312742WHEN: Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 9:00-11:00 AM

WHERE: 5th Floor Conference Room, Wilson Center

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Los Zetas where once Mexico’s most feared criminal organization dominating important smuggling routes from Central America into the United States. Their success was based in part on a business model that combined brute strength and predatory business practices. Join us for a discussion with the author of a new book, Los Zetas, Inc.: Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico and a panel of experts on the nature of criminal enterprise and the challenges of controlling illicit economies.

Author

Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, Associate Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University; Global Fellow, Wilson Center

Commentators

Vanda Felbab Brown, Senior Fellow, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution

Steven Dudley, Co-director, InSight Crime

Nicholas Miroff, National Security Correspondent, The Washington Post

Moderator

Eric L. Olson, Senior Adviser, Mexico Institute; Deputy Director, Latin American Program Wilson Center

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