Canada, Mexico can integrate supply chain much more: minister

3/17/2017 Reuters

NAFTA_logoThere is plenty of scope for Mexico and Canada to deepen supply chain integration, Canada’s trade minister said on Friday, in the latest nod to boosting North American industry in the face of U.S. President Donald Trump’s pledge to boost jobs.

“We have a good relationship, but I do believe when you look at the supply chain in North America, we can do so much more together,” Canadian Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said at an event in the northern Mexican city of Monterrey.

“We value our political and commercial relationship with Mexico and we will work closely with Mexico to build a more prosperous North America,” he added.

Trump wants to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Mexico and Canada, and has threatened to ditch it if he cannot get a better deal in his efforts to protect U.S. manufacturing jobs.

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In Trump era, some Mexican migrants head north – to Canada

3/16/2017 Reuters

visa canadaShortly after crossing the Rio Grande into the gang-infested border city of Reynosa, dozens of Mexicans deported during U.S President Donald Trump’s first days in office said they would soon try to head north again – but this time to Canada.

In a Reynosa migrant shelter, just yards from the U.S. border, 26-year-old Cenobio Rita said he had earned about $3,000 a month installing playgrounds in Richmond, Virginia, before he was deported on Feb. 15 after police found marijuana in his car.

Having left Mexico as a 14-year-old, he fretted about returning to his violent home state of Michoacan. With Trump taking a tough stance on undocumented immigrants, he ruled out a common path for many deportees – back into the United States.

“I want to go to Canada with my passport,” he said. “For those without documents, I think (the United States) is over. Now it’s Canada’s turn.”

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US President Helps Fuel Surge in Mexican Tourism to Canada

3/14/2017 New York Times

canada flag I.A.M. photo
Photo by Flickr user I.A.M.

TORONTO — President Donald Trump loomed large in the mind of Mexico City plastic surgeon Rodrigo Munoz as he was deciding where to go for a winter ski vacation.

Munoz has skied in Nevada and New Mexico, but what he and many others perceive as Trump’s hostile posture toward Mexico made him seek out a more hospitable climate to spend his time and money. He went to the Canadian Rockies instead.

“I don’t want to go to a country that does not accept the people from my country,” Munoz said after his recent return from a weeklong trip.

Many of his fellow Mexicans share this view. Canada has seen a surge of visitors from Mexico since December, when it lifted a visa requirement that had been imposed in 2009. The change was planned before the U.S. election, but it is widely viewed as a reflection of warmer relations between Canada and Mexico. Trump, meanwhile, is pushing for a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, has stepped up immigration enforcement and wants to re-negotiate the North America Free Trade Agreement, the 1994 treaty that created a closer trading relationship among the three countries of North America.

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Mexico and Canada Say Nafta Should Be Re-Negotiated Trilaterally

2/21/2017 Bloomberg

NAFTAThe foreign ministers of Mexico and Canada presented a unified front ahead of potential trade talks with Donald Trump’s administration, stressing the North American Free Trade Agreement has benefited all three countries.

Mexico’s Luis Videgaray and Canada’s Chrystia Freeland said Nafta should be re-negotiated with all three nations seated at the table, rather than in bilateral discussions.

“We very much recognize that Nafta is a three-country agreement,” Freeland said Tuesday at a panel discussion with Videgaray in Toronto ahead of private trade talks. “We really value our relationship with Mexico.”

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North American Climate Cooperation at a Crossroads

2/17/2017 Center for American Progress

North AmericaOver the past year, there has been significant progress in the North American effort to address climate change. One case in point is the North American Climate, Clean Energy, and Environment Partnership, which the national governments of the United States, Mexico, and Canada created in June 2016. Outside of the European Union, it is the most ambitious attempt yet to integrate environment, energy, and climate priorities and policies at a regional level.

Since the November 2016 U.S. presidential election, however, the North American relationship on climate change—as well as the North American relationship on a range of other issues—has been uncertain at best. This uncertainty came to the fore during Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s visit with President Donald Trump on Monday, when climate change was mentioned in neither the leaders’ joint statement nor the joint press conference. Although it is possible that the leaders discussed it behind closed doors, there is so far no indication of this.

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Trump rebukes Mexico again after meeting with Canada’s Trudeau

2/13/2017 CNBC

trumptrudeauPresident Donald Trump has repeatedly slammed the North American Free Trade Agreement, but he signaled Monday that one of the United States partners in the deal could face more drastic changes than the other.

After Trump met with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the White House, the leaders touted the neighbors’ trade relationship, with Trudeau signaling they wanted to continue “effective integration of our two economies.” Trump has repeatedly slammed NAFTA as a drag on American jobs, but said he thinks the U.S. gets a worse deal from its southern neighbor, Mexico, than from Canada.

“We have a very outstanding trade relationship with Canada. We’ll be tweaking it. We’ll be doing certain things that are going to benefit both of our countries. It’s a much less severe situation than what’s taken place on the southern border,” Trump said at a joint White House press conference with Trudeau.

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Trump’s wall, immigration curbs, could bring more Mexicans to Canada

2/7/2017 Reuters

canadaNEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Canada could see more asylum seekers from Mexico because of U.S. President Donald Trump’s anti-immigration policies, the U.N. and refugee advocates said.

Given Trump’s calls to build a wall along the Mexico border and to ban refugees, Mexican migrants may try to head straight to Canada, they said.

One scenario is “that people will … jump straight to come to Canada – by air, by plane – and launch an asylum claim here in Canada,” Jean-Nicolas Beuze, the head of the U.N. refugee agency UNHCR in Canada said in a telephone interview.

“When the direct crossing into neighboring countries is made more difficult by administrative measures, new policies, new laws, or in this case a wall, people … look at other options,” he said.

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