Mexico’s agrifood exports highest in 29 years between January and May

07/20/2021

Source: Mexico News Daily

The value of Mexico’s agrifood exports in the first five months of the year was the highest in 29 years, the Agriculture Ministry said. Agrifood products destined for foreign shores brought in US $18.7 billion from January through May, and imports were just under $14.5 billion for a surplus of $4.23 billion, the fourth highest in 27 years.

Of the $33.2 billion agrifood trade with foreign countries, 56.4% was money entering the economy: more than earnings from petroleum exports or foreign tourism.

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Exclusive: Mexico may raise U.S. farm concerns if energy dispute bites, minister says

01/12/2021

Source: Reuters

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico could raise concerns over potential barriers to its agriculture exports to the United States in any future negotiations over the Mexican government’s contentious energy policy, Economy Minister Tatiana Clouthier said.

Since President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office in late 2018 vowing to strengthen the state’s influence over energy policy, Mexico has been at increasing odds with international investors due to measures he has overseen to achieve that goal.

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Imported tortillas? Big Mexican farmers fear cuts will hit harvests

10/15/2020

Source: Reuters

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico’s most productive farmers fear they may not be able to meet growing demand after state funding cuts, warning of a rising reliance on imports of the white corn used for staples such as tortillas and tamales.

Under President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the agricultural budget has been cropped by a third, with subsidies aimed at larger farmers, who account for two-thirds of corn production, almost entirely eliminated.

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Mexican farmers occupy dam to stop water payments to the United States

09/14/2020

Source: The Washington Post

For 75 years, through tensions and disputes over immigration, narcotrafficking and trade, Mexico and the United States have sent each other billions of gallons of water annually to irrigate farms along the border under a treaty signed during World War II.

But today, the 1944 agreement is facing increasingly violent opposition in drought-parched Chihuahua state, where protesters have seized control of a major dam to dramatize the plight of farmers whose cotton, tomato and pecan crops, they say, depend on the water that’s being sent north.

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Mexico bars shipment of glyphosate pesticide

two test tubes
Photo by Martin Lopez on Pexels.com

11/25/19 – AP News

The Mexican government says it won’t allow a 1,000-ton shipment of the pesticide glyphosate into the country, citing health and environmental concerns.

Mexico became the latest in a string of countries to announce bans on glyphosate, the active ingredient in weed killer Roundup.

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Inside the bloody cartel war for Mexico’s multibillion-dollar avocado industry

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11/20/19 – Los Angeles Times

By Katie Linthicum

The cartel members showed up in this verdant stretch of western Mexico armed with automatic weapons and chainsaws.

Soon they were cutting timber day and night, the crash of falling trees echoing throughout the virgin forest. When locals protested, explaining that the area was protected from logging, they were held at gunpoint and ordered to keep quiet.

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Ethanol trade team from Mexico visits Nebraska to understand US ethanol industry

green grass field
Photo by Tonya Kumpula on Pexels.com

10/25/19 – High Plains Journal

Nebraska Corn Board

A delegation of 19 industry leaders from Mexico were in Nebraska recently to gain a better understanding of the U.S. ethanol sector. FroThe delegation toured all facets of Nebraska’s ethanol industry, from cornfield to fuel retailer.

 

On the first day of their trip, the group was provided with an overview of Nebraska’s agricultural and ethanol industries before they traveled to Giltner and visited Hunnicutt Farms. At the farm, the team learned about corn, seed corn, popcorn and soybean production. Through the discussions, the delegation was introduced to cutting-edge technologies in American agriculture and were able to better understand how some farmers utilize irrigation equipment.

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Is your tequila jeopardizing Mexico?

macro photography of leaves
Photo by Dred Geib on Pexels.com

10/22/19 – The Durango Herald

By Lis McLaughlin

If it seems like tequila has been rising in popularity among spirits drinkers, it’s because it has. According to a 2018 U.S. market report, the global market for Tequila is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of about 4.1% over the next 10 years.

This boom, however, has created an agave shortage that is threatening the integrity of the product, the welfare of the agave laborers and the ecology of the agave plant.

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In Mexico, ‘green gold’ brings both riches and violence

Fruit Hass Avocado Harvest Avocados Picked Green
Fruit Hass Avocado Harvest Avocados Picked Green

10/23/19 – AP News

Mark Stevenson

Small-scale avocado growers armed with AR-15 rifles take turns manning a vigilante checkpoint to guard against thieves and drug cartel extortionists in this town Michoacan state, the heartland of world production of the fruit locals call “green gold.”

The region’s avocado boom, fueled by soaring U.S. consumption, has raised parts of western Mexico out of poverty in just 10 years. But the scent of money has drawn gangs and hyper-violent cartels that have hung bodies from bridges and cowed police forces, and the rising violence is threatening the newfound prosperity. A recent U.S. warning that it could withdraw orchard inspectors sent a shiver through the $2.4 billion-a-year export industry.

Court vacates 2017 amendments to U.S.-Mexico sugar trade pact

 

bakery baking blur close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

10/22/19 – Food Business News

By Ron Sterk

The U.S. Court of International Trade in New York on Oct. 18 vacated the 2017 amendments to the 2014 agreements that suspended sizable anti-dumping and countervailing duties on U.S. imports of sugar from Mexico. In both rulings (vacating the countervailing duty and the anti-dumping amendments), the court said, “The court concludes (1) that Commerce’s failure to follow the recordkeeping requirements of 1677f(a)(3) cannot be described as ‘harmless’ and (2) that the agency’s recordkeeping failure substantially prejudiced Plaintiff.”

The rulings leave the original 2014 “suspension agreements” in place, which had the refined/raw mix of sugar imports from Mexico at 53%/47%, the polarity for “other” sugar at 99.5 and reference prices for refined sugar at 26c a lb and for raw at 22.25c a lb. The 2017 amendments had adjusted the refined/raw import mix to 30%/70%, lowered the polarity for “other” sugar to 99.2 (thus 99.2 polarity and above was classified as refined sugar in the amendments), and raised the reference prices to 28c for refined and 23c for raw.

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