Headlines from Mexico

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Week of February 24– March 1, 2019

Mexican Film “Roma” wins best Foreign Language Film; Cinematography  

Alfonso Cuaron’s latest film “Roma” won the Academy Award’s prize for cinematography and best foreign language film while Cuaron received the prize for best director. Several Mexicans expected the Netflix’s debutant to receive the award for best picture and Yaliza Aparicio to receive the award for best actress.

Polygon, ABC, Variety

 

President Lopez Obrador bids auctions cars

The auction of official vehicles, which took place this weekend, was “very successful”, since 90 percent of the vehicles were sold, said President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. In a morning conference, he explained that only 22 luxury cars remained, of the 218 that were offered.

Milenio, El Sol de México, La Jornada

 

Mexican Congress approves National Guard

Mexico’s Congress on Thursday approved the creation of a 60,000-member National Guard to tackle the nation’s public security crisis, a force that President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has made a cornerstone of his plan to confront organized crime and curb soaring violence.

The New York Times, Telemundo, Huff Post

 

Week of strikes for Mexico

The Secretariat of Labor and Social Prevention recognized that up to the end of this week, there are reportedly 15 active federal strikes. While only three began in January, there are many more in the last weeks. The institution also said that three of the most important unions in the country are associated with these strikes: Mexico’s Workers Confederation (CTM), Revolutionary Confederation of Workers and Agricultural Workers (CROC), and the Regional Confederation of Mexican Workers (CROM).

The Wall Street Journal, El Dictamen, El Universal

 

President releases intelligence archives

President Lopez Obrador announced this Friday that will bring to light the confidential documents of his intelligence services. More than nine decades of work by the “political police”, as defined by the Mexican president, ranging from the archives of the Federal Security Directorate (DFS), the PRI’s political espionage arm -declassified in part- to its heir organization after 1985: the Cisen.

El País, La Jornada, Nación 321

 

 

 

 

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