Mexican Rebel Leader Subcomandante Marcos Retires, Changes Name

May 29, 2014

The Wall Street Journal, 5/29/14

Old revolutionaries apparently needn’t die these days in Mexico. They can just change their name and fade away. The man who, until it was announced in a statement Sunday, called himself Subcomandante Marcos, the nonindigenous leader of a Maya Indian rebellion that jolted Mexico two decades ago, now insists on being called Subcomandante Galeano. He also announced his retirement from his day job as rebel leader and spokesman.

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Zapatistas break silence to slam Mexico elite

February 15, 2013

subcomandante marcosAl Jazeera, 2/15/2013

After years of silence, secluded in their base communities in Mexico’s impoverished south, indigenous Zapatista rebels have re-emerged with a series of public statements in recent weeks, attempting to reignite passions for their demands of “land, liberty, work and peace”.

In December, 40,000 Zapatista supporters marched through villages in Chiapas, re-asserting their presence. In January and February, Subcomandate Marcos – the Zapatistas’ pipe-smoking, non-indigenous spokesman and an international media darling – issued a series of communiques slamming the government of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, a member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) which assumed power in December.

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Sleuth Keeps His Good Eye On Mexico City’s Crime

June 29, 2012

NPR, 06/29/2012

The central character in Paco Ignacio Taibo II’s crime novels is Hector Belascoaran Shayne, a former engineer who got a “certificate in detection” through a correspondence course. Belascoaran is a cynical, bumbling private eye who marvels at the chaotic street life unfolding around him in Mexico City.

Taibo’s detective novels veer in and out of reality. Historical figures mix with fictional characters. Things happen or maybe they didn’t. One novel, The Uncomfortable Dead, is actually co-written with Subcomandante Marcos, the former leader of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation. And the story includes a fictional cameo appearance by Marcos himself.

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Mexico’s Subcomandante Marcos makes a rare appearance

January 5, 2009

Los Angeles Times, 1/5/2009

subcomandante_marcos1Who was that masked man?

Fifteen years after his uprising shocked Mexico’s status quo, and a year after he more or less dropped out of public view, Subcomandante Marcos had made a comeback appearance.

At least, it seemed to be Marcos. He was, after all, wearing his trademark black ski mask.

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