Billionaire Slim’s Workers Stage Walkout in Support of Students

November 20, 2014

11/20/14 Bloomberg 

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP - Getty Images

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP – Getty Images

Employees of billionaire Carlos Slim’s telephone company plan to join relatives of 43 missing college students to protest the government’s response to the mass disappearance in Iguala, Mexico. The union at America Movil SAB (AMXL)’s Telmex landline unit will hold a 24-hour walkout and called on members to join demonstrators in Mexico City’s central square, union chief Francisco Hernandez said. The marches are scheduled for this afternoon. “We can’t turn our gaze away and pretend this doesn’t concern us,” Hernandez said in a video message to Telmex employees yesterday. “We have to look for solutions not just for the disappeared young people so that this tragedy never happens again, but also to lead this country on a path to have justice, to eradicate impunity and corruption.”

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Mexico at breaking point as anti-government anger escalates

November 20, 2014

11/19/14 The Guardian 

AFP

AFP

Mexico is facing an escalating political crisis amid growing fury over a mansion built for the presidential family and the disappearance and probable massacre of 43 student teachers. The two apparently unrelated issues have fed the widespread perception that unbridled political corruption is the underlying cause of the country’s many problems – ranging from stunted economic growth to a breakdown of law and order that has left parts of the country at the mercy of murderous drug cartels. “The drama of Mexico is about impunity,” said leading political commentator Jesús Silva-Herzog. “This is not about the popularity or unpopularity of the president, that is irrelevant. It is about credibility and trust and, at its root, it is about legitimacy.”

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Protests rage over missing students in Mexico ahead of national strike

November 18, 2014

11/17/14 Aljazeera 

MIGUEL TOVAR / LATINCONTENT / GETTY

MIGUEL TOVAR / LATINCONTENT / GETTY

Protests over the disappearance of 43 missing students raged across Mexico and the United States over the weekend. Activists blamed a government they say has ties to organized crime and called for people in Mexico and the U.S. to support a Mexico-wide strike on Thursday. Coinciding with the Nov. 20 strike, protest marches will be held in Mexico City, as well as dozens of cities across the U.S. including New York City and Los Angeles. “We want to warn that these acts of protest will not be silenced while the civil and human rights of our Mexican brothers continue to be violated and trampled on by a government that has colluded with organized crime and to those who blamed the crimes committed by the state on [cartels] — thereby evading their own responsibility in the state sponsored genocide that has been committed with total impunity,” #YoSoy123NY, the New York chapter of a Mexican social movement that opposes Mexico’s current government, said in a statement handed out at a protest in New York City on Sunday.

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Tired and Angry, Mexico’s Protests Show No Signs of Abating

November 17, 2014

11/15/14 Foreign Policy 

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP - Getty Images

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP – Getty Images

Mexico is in crisis. In recent weeks, tens of thousands of furious protestors have taken to the streets of cities across the country. The furor stems from the disappearance and all-but-certain killing of 43 male students of the Raul Isidro Burgos College in Ayotzinapa, at the hands of corrupt police allegedly working with a local drug cartel. The vicious crime and alleged grisly disposal of the students’ bodies has touched a nerve across a country sick of violence and corruption in daily life. And it has exposed the government of President Enrique Peña Nieto — eager to turn the country away from the drug war he inherited and towards ambitious economic reform agenda that depends on foreign investment — to an uncomfortable spotlight. The roots of the protests predate the horror in Iguala and the Peña Nieto administration. They are, in a sense, the latest phase of the historic struggle between Mexico’s student left and the federal government, one that has been brewing for years if not decades. But this time the fury has moved out of the left-wing teachers’ colleges and restive southern states and into the rest of the country.

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Protests Over Mexico’s Inaction on 43 Missing Students

November 6, 2014

11/06/14 NBC News 

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP - Getty Images

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP – Getty Images

It’s been 40 days since 43 college students vanished and on Wednesday there was anger in the streets here.Tens of thousands of demonstrators brought parts of Mexico City to a standstill as protesters demanded more action from federal authorities to find the students who have been missing since late September.The marchers included students from the rural college the 43 attended in southwestern Mexico — and also regular people from all walks of life who were frustrated with what they called government corruption and cooperation with murderous drug cartels.

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Mexico protesters angered over 43 missing students

November 6, 2014

11/05/14 CBC News 

The Associated Press October 22, 2014

The Associated Press October 22, 2014

Tens of thousands of people marched down Mexico City’s main boulevard Wednesday evening to protest the disappearance of 43 young people in the southern part of the country and demand the government find them.The largely young crowd carried Mexican flags with black mourning bands replacing the red and green stripes, counting off the numbers from one to 43. Protesters also chanted: “They took them away alive, and alive we want them back.”

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Powerful Photos Capture the Student Protests Barely Anyone Is Talking About

October 20, 2014

10/16/14 World.Mic

Duncan Wood

While the world has focused its attention on the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, there’s another student movement gaining steam on the other side of the world. The unfolding protests gripping Mexico began in the small town of Iguala, in the southwest region of Guerrero state, where the disappearance of 43 student teachers on the night of Sept. 26 has sparked outrage amid allegations of collaboration between local police and organized crime. “Iguala is just one example of the level of decay in state and municipal security institutions,” Duncan Wood, director of the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C., told the Washington Post.

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