Mexico conservative party leader Madero stands down temporarily

October 1, 2014

09/30/14 Reuters

panThe leader of Mexico’s biggest opposition party is stepping aside temporarily to seek a congressional seat next year at which time he could resume his post as party leader. Gustavo Madero, head of the center-right National Action Party (PAN), was immediately replaced at the helm by his deputy, the party said in a post on Twitter on Tuesday. Madero has been grappling with an internal power struggle over how far his party should have cooperated with President Enrique Pena Nieto’s centrist Institutional Revolutionary Party on a wide-ranging economic reform agenda. The PAN’s new interim president is 35-year-old Ricardo Anaya, previously the party’s second-ranking official as well as a former federal congressman who served as president of Mexico’s lower chamber of Congress earlier this year.

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General Secretary of PAN Party Assassinated in Guerrero State, Mexico

September 29, 2014

09/28/14 TELESUR

panOn Sunday, a group of unknown people murdered Braulio Zaragoza Maganda, the general secretary of National Action Party, one of the three main political parties in Mexico. Zaragoza was in a restaurant in a hotel of Acapulco when three gunshots killed him at around 8.30 a.m., informed the Public Ministry, quoted by Mexican press agency Notimex. The general attorney will investigate the murder, added the statement. The national president of PAN, Gustavo Madero, also requested a deep investigation. “The atmosphere of insecurity and impunity experienced in Mexico” can not be tolerated, he stated.

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Mexico conservatives replace congressional whip following party scandal

August 13, 2014

08/13/14 Fox News

panMexico’s conservative National Action Party has replaced its congressional minority leader after he and other party leaders were seen on a video dancing with escorts.

The party is known as the PAN and has often taken moralistic positions, like banning public kissing in one city it governs.

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Mexican protest over regulations should not derail energy reform

March 18, 2014

shutterstock_105329711FuelFix, 3/17/14

An opposition party protest in Mexico over proposed energy reform laws is not likely to significantly delay the opening of the nation’s oil and gas reserves to foreign companies, a legal expert said Monday. On Thursday, the Senate leader of the National Action Party, or PAN, walked out of congressional negotiations on laws necessary to implement the reform legislation passed in December. The politician protested the amount of authority the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has proposed to retain, according to Gabriel Salinas, an attorney at Mayer Brown focused on the Mexican oil and gas sector, who is closely following the progress of the reforms.

The PAN has since issued a list of concerns about the congressional negotiations over the  rules that will govern the opening of Mexico’s energy sector to private investment. Under the new constitutional amendments, Mexican lawmakers were given an April 20 deadline to develop more specific legal guidelines for how the energy reforms would be implemented, including how oil profits would be handled.

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What Does Mexico’s Oil Industry Reform Mean For Investors?

December 16, 2013

Forbes, 12/16/2013

Ancient Mayan pyramid, KukulcanLast week Mexico’s Congress approved a bill to end a seven-decade long state oil monopoly. In coming years foreign companies could invest as much as $20 billion a year in Mexico’s oil sector, thanks to new rules that will allow production sharing.

Although the energy reform bill, spearheaded by Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto during his first year in office, has been vociferously opposed by Mexico’s left, the bill has the backing of Peña’s centrist PRI party as well as the right-of-center party of former President Felipe Calderon. Together the PRI and the PAN had enough votes to push the bill through Congress, where it was approved 353-134.

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Country of the Year? Try Mexico

December 16, 2013

Christian Science Monitor, 12/15/2013

Mexican Flag XXLLast week’s approval of reforms for the pivotal oil company Pemex caps a year of major reforms that could transform Mexico – and perhaps change the immigration debate in the US.

If an award could be given in 2013 for Country of the Year, Mexico might deserve it. No other country has done more this past year to put reforms in place to transform a nation – and with startling democratic consensus. The latest reform, approved Thursday by elected lawmakers, will allow foreign and private investment in the oil sector for the first time in more than 70 years. The move upends a notion of Mexican patriotism that stated the national identity rests on government monopoly of the petroleum industry.

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Enrique Peña Nieto yet to deliver reforms for Mexico

December 6, 2013

Financial Times, 12/5/2013

Enrique Pena NietoIt has been 20 years since Mexico signed the North American Free Trade Agreement, 13 years since the end of one-party presidential rule, and one year since Enrique Peña Nieto began his presidency promising to modernise the country. The first two were decisive moments for Latin America’s second-biggest economy. They also proved to be false dawns.

Shortly after Nafta came into effect, Mexico suffered the crushing devaluation of the peso – the Tequila crisis – dashing hopes of imminent prosperity. As for democracy, fewer Mexicans today believe it is the best form of government than in 2000. Will the “Mexican moment” of Mr Peña Nieto’s government prove a similar disappointment?

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