New Publication: Integrating North America’s Energy: A Call for Action

December 17, 2014

By Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute

stock-footage-montage-of-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-pollutionIn February 2014, the leaders of the three North American nations met in Toluca, Mexico, and determined a range of measures to enhance regional competitiveness, including new initiatives on transportation infrastructure, borders and research cooperation. Furthermore, the leaders agreed that, before the end of 2014, a North American Energy Ministers Meeting should take place to “define areas for strong trialteral cooperation on energy.” What these areas might be is still unannounced, but with the successful passage of energy reform legislation through Mexico’s Congress in December 2013, and secondary legislation in August 2014, many of the previously existing barriers to cooperation on oil and gas markets have now disappeared.

The prospects for an energy abundant North America are compelling. Combined, the three countries’ oil production compares favorably with those of the Middle East. As the United States surpassed Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest producer, and with both Mexico and Canada on the verge of significant increases in production, North America’s long-standing position as a hydrocarbons importer will then be reversed. The outlook for North American energy is therefore bright, and the transformation in the regional energy paradigm has been dramatic. However, to achieve the full potential of this newly discovered regional energy wealth, it will be necessary to more fully integrate the three countries’ energy markets. This paper argues that, in order to make North American energy independence a reality, there are several main areas that require attention from the three governments, working together, to make the transition to an integrated North American energy system.

Read the report here.


Confronting Challenges to North America’s Energy Future

December 12, 2014

12/12/2014 Duncan Wood and Rachel Bronson via Forbes.com

stock-footage-montage-of-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-pollutionNorth America is fast becoming the epicenter of a transformation in global energy. Canada, Mexico and the United States are bringing to market huge new energy resources that were too expensive or politically risky to exploit until recently.  According to the Energy Information Administration, North American oil and gas growth is expected to exceed all of OPEC’s over the next decade.

But despite North America’s huge energy potential, the United States, Mexico, and Canada all face serious obstacles in getting their energy resources to market. Skills gaps and low public support for energy infrastructure stand in the way of a potentially rich North American energy future. As the three North American energy ministers prepare to meet in Washington on December 15th, they must develop innovative policy solutions to overcome these barriers and create the necessary support structure to fully realize North America’s emerging energy boom.

Read more…


Is North America’s Energy Boom a Global Game Changer?

December 8, 2014

11/26/14 Wilson Center REWIND

stock-footage-montage-of-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-pollutionIncreases in energy production in Canada and the U.S., combined with promising reforms in Mexico, are creating what some describe as a “North American energy renaissance.” The world’s energy equation is changing, with more developments on the way. What are the implications of traditional energy producers becoming consumers and consumers becoming producers? That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Click here to watch the video.

To see video from the Wilson Center’s First Annual North American Energy Forum, click here.

Speakers:

David Biette, Director, Canada Institute, moderator
Charles K. Ebinger, Senior Fellow and Director, Energy Security Initiative, The Brookings Institution
David L. Goldwyn, President, Goldwyn Global Strategies LLC, former State Department Coordinator for International Energy Affairs, and Co-Editor, Energy & Security: Strategies for a World in Transition
Robert (“RJ”) Johnston, CEO and Director, Global Energy & Natural Resources, The Eurasia Group
Jan H. Kalicki, Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar and lead, Regional and Global Energy Issues; Co-editor, Energy & Security: Strategies for a World in Transition
Shirley Neff, Senior Adviser, US Energy Information Administration, former Senior Adviser, US Commission on the BP Oil Spill
Andrew Selee, Wilson Center Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute


Mexico energy reform could create North American powerhouse

May 7, 2014

finance-market_dataHouston Business Journal, 5/7/14

As Mexico prepares to open itself to international energy investment, politicians and energy executives said the move could lead to a strong North American energy collaborative. Mexican energy reform proved a hot topic over the first two days of the 2014 Offshore Technology Conference at NRG Park in Houston with politicians and executives from Mexico, Canada, the U.S. and more touting the possibilities.

Congressman Bill Flores, R-Waco, said the developments should lead to a “regional powerhouse that I think can be stronger than OPEC.” “It’s the dawn of a new day for Mexico,” Flores said May 6.BP America Chairman and CEO John Minge said May 5 at OTC 2014 that he is “excited” about the possibilities in Mexico, particularly in the deepwater offshore as BP (NYSE: BP) rebounds in the Gulf of Mexico.

Read more…


John Kerry to John Baird: no Keystone answer yet

January 17, 2014

NAFTACBC News, 01/17/2014

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says he still doesn’t have an answer on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline extension, and suggests it won’t be coming any time soon.

Kerry, as well as Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird and Mexican Foreign Secretary Jose Antonio Meade, took questions from reporters Friday morning in Washington, with Kerry’s opening remarks stressing the “unity” among the three countries.

Read more…


Obama to head to Mexico in February

January 16, 2014

obama_nieto_featureThe Washington Times, 01/13/2014

President Obama will travel to Toluca, Mexico, on Feb. 19 for a meeting with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the White House announced Monday.

The gathering of North American leaders will focus on “issues important to the daily lives of all of North America’s people, including economic competitiveness, entrepreneurship, trade and investment and citizen security,” White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters

Read more…

 


NAFTA at 20: Ready to take off again?

January 9, 2014

120px-North_America_(orthographic_projection).svgThe Economist, 01/04/2014

Pass through the gates of the Bombardier plant in Querétaro and you leave the Mexico of potholed roads and blaring horns behind: welcome to a strangely serene place called North America.

In the car park neat lines of vehicles all face the same way—almost unthinkable elsewhere in Mexico. The factory is run by a woman—ditto. Enter the building where the cockpit, fuselage and tail section of Bombardier’s new eight-seat Learjet 85 business jet are being made and it looks more like a laboratory than a factory.

Technicians with face masks work behind glass in a dust-free room. Instead of metal, layers of carbon fibre cut by laser are moulded and baked in a giant oven to make a seamless fuselage (pictured). There are no pungent, oily smells, no urgent, whining drills, no soul-stirring hammering. It would be the dullest factory visit your correspondent has ever made—were it not for what it says about the future of North America.

Read more…


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