Mexico’s 2012 Presidential Election – Mapping Results

July 2, 2012

Terra/IFE, 07/01/2012

For a continuous update on the voting results of the election, by state, click here.

 


Video: Josefina Vázquez Mota spoke to the nation and acknowledged defeat [in Spanish]

July 2, 2012

Univision, 07/01/2012

Josefina Vázquez Mota

Josefina Vázquez Mota spoke to the nation and acknowledged her defeat earlier in the evening.

To see video click here.


Mexico’s new president will face a changing nation [Op-Ed]

June 29, 2012

The Washington Post, Editorial Board, 6/29/2012

Mexico has a more organized civil society and stronger news media than ever before. The question about the telegenic Mr. Peña Nieto is not whether he would return to the past but whether he can succeed at breaking the grip of entrenched interests and drug cartels.

The next president will need a fresh approach.

Read more…


Mexico presidential candidates pledge to respect election results

June 29, 2012

Fox News Latino, 06/29/2012

Mexico’s four presidential candidates signed a pact to respect the results of Sunday’s elections and reject any acts of violence.

“The pact must be understood as a commitment of all political parties to respect in every electoral area the will of the citizens as expressed at the polls,” IFE chair Leonardo Valdes said.


New graphs from JOIN – Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias

June 22, 2012

Jovenes Informados: Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias, June 2012

The Mexico based Group ‘JOIN: Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias’ has released two graphs in the series ‘Propuestas Candidatos 2012′ having to do with the economy in Mexico. According to the group, their graphs are based on publicly available information and are intended to inform the public on the proposals of the presidential candidates regarding a variety of issues currently facing Mexico.

To see the graphs click on the following: Economy graph 1. Economy graph 2.


New graphs from JOIN – Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias

June 22, 2012

Jovenes Informados: Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias, May 2012

The Mexico based Group ‘JOIN: Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias’ has released two graphs in the series ‘Propuestas Candidatos 2012′ having to do with science/technology and energy in Mexico. According to the group, their graphs are based on publicly available information and are intended to inform the public on the proposals of the presidential candidates regarding a variety of issues currently facing Mexico.

To see the graphs click on the following: Energy graph 1. Science and technology graph 2.


New graphs from JOIN – Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias

June 22, 2012

Jovenes Informados: Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias, May 2012

The Mexico based Group ‘JOIN: Agencia Ciudadana de Noticias’ has released two graphs in the series ‘Propuestas Candidatos 2012′ having to do with poverty in Mexico. According to the group, their graphs are based on publicly available information and are intended to inform the public on the proposals of the presidential candidates regarding a variety of issues currently facing Mexico.

To see the graphs click on the following: Poverty graph 1. Poverty graph 2.


New Publication: Mexico’s Election and the Economy – Voters Face a Tough Decision

May 17, 2012

Center for Strategic and International Studies, 5/17/12

Although security is commonly seen as the defining issue in Mexico’s upcoming presidential election, the country’s economic development ranks a close second in voters’ minds.

On July 1, despite the pervasiveness of the drug war in the political and social discourse, voters will make their decision based largely on the perceived successes and failures of 12 years of rule by the National Action Party (PAN).  This is partly because the three main parties have currently presented minor differences in tackling the security problem and partly because the Mexican economy continues to show such a dramatically uneven development pattern.

Of particular importance are continuing high levels of inequality manifested in Mexico’s society, a direct result of an economic system that, despite its current vitality, still offers little opportunity for upward mobility for most citizens.

The full publication is available here, at CSIS.


Mexico’s leading presidential candidate is handsome, popular and still a mystery

May 14, 2012

The Washington Post, 5/14/12

In his campaign for president, Mexico’s handsome front-runner, Enrique Peña Nieto, looks down from towering billboards with a movie-star smile. “Tu me conoces,” he says. You know me. But the fact is, many don’t.

With the July 1 presidential vote only weeks away, Peña Nieto holds a solid double-digit lead in the polls. But Mexican voters and U.S. observers confess that they do not really know what the candidate stands for. Nor are they sure how he would govern Mexico, a vital trade partner for the United States, Mexico’s ally in the fight against drug cartels. “Do people really know him?” asked independent pollster Roy Campos. “No, but they want to get to know him.”

Disparaged by his opponents as a pretty puppet and telegenic con man, the 45-year-old Peña Nieto is a masterful retail politician who, through message discipline and sophisticated marketing, has made himself the new face of the Institutional Revolutionary Party. Known as the PRI, the autocratic political machine fell from power in 2000 after running Mexico with a blend of corruption and coercion for 71 years.

Read more…


Disenchantment may keep Mexico’s young voters on sidelines

May 12, 2012

Los Angeles Times, 5/12/12

Many feel alienated and disgusted by the lack of democratic progress in the nation and say they may boycott the presidential election. They areMexico’s “democracy babies” — a generation that grew up just as the nation broke free of decades of all-encompassing one-party rule.

Only 12 years ago, young people flocked to the polls with high hopes as part of what would be a historic ouster of the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. Now, as the country prepares to pick a new president in July,Mexico’s young sound mostly disillusioned by the choices before them, and by joblessness and skyrocketing drug violence that have hit them especially hard. On paper at least, these 24 million voters under 30 — nearly a third of the electorate — could be a powerful voice for change. But many have come to view the democratic transition as so much blah-blah-blah in the face of a system that remains deeply marred by corruption and filled with politicians who are as self-interested as ever.

“Why go vote? It’s only a waste of time. They’re all the same — they all lie, they all steal and no one helps you,” said 20-year-old Sergio Guerrero, who on a recent day was selling lamb tacos at a street market here.

Read more…


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 9,815 other followers