Mexico’s Auto Industry Overtakes Brazil’s

August 8, 2014

08/08/14 The Wall Street Journal

cars in trafficBolstered by a recovering North American market, the output of Mexico’s booming automotive industry is cementing a slight lead over Brazil, its stumbling regional rival.

Mexico’s export-driven production of cars and light trucks jumped 7.5% in the first seven months of 2014 to nearly 1.86 million vehicles, compared to the same period a year earlier, according to data released by Mexico´s automotive-producers chamber.

Read more…


Why Mexico Is Speeding Past Brazil in Cars

July 11, 2014

07/11/14 Bloomberg Businessweek

Washauto06_bmw_325_AudeVivereRemember in the 1990s when some Cassandras feared the North American Free Trade Agreement would someday help Mexico eclipse car production of its higher-cost rivals north of the border? Two decades later, Mexico is making its move, but against another competitor: Brazil.

The country is poised to overtake South America’s largest nation as the top Latin American automobile producer for the first time in more than a decade. Mexico’s ascent is fueled in part by auto sales running at the fastest pace in almost eight years in the U.S., its largest market. The boom coincides with a slump in Brazilian production through June as its domestic demand cools.

Read more…


Mexico Passing Brazil as Top Latin American Car Producer

July 7, 2014

07/07/14 Bloomberg

shutterstock_142650745Mexico is poised to overtake Brazil as the top Latin American automobile producer for the first time in more than a decade as surging exports to the U.S. spur factory openings and record output.

After nosing ahead of Brazil in the first five months of the year, Mexico is projected to hold its advantage through 2014, for the first full-year lead since 2002, according to consultant IHS Automotive.

Mexico’s ascent is being fueled in part by auto sales running at the fastest pace in almost eight years in the U.S., the country’s largest market. The boom coincides with a slump in Brazilian production through May as domestic demand cools, setting up a shift in leadership of the Latin American industry faster than analysts predicted.

Read more…


Despite reforms, Brazil and Mexico lack energy investment

December 6, 2013

Financial Post, 12/4/2013

Oil barrelsBoth Brazil and Mexico’s traditional and renewable energy sectors are expected to grow, if they can continue to make positive policy reforms and attract the necessary investment. In 2012, Latin America and the Caribbean claimed only 6% of the world’s investment in renewable energy – the majority of which went to Brazil and increasingly Chile – but analysts at the Inter-American Development Bank claim that the region is the “new frontier“ for clean energy investment.

If the region is to live up to these high expectations, its energy-rich countries must raise capital to the tune of $430 billion to fully develop its clean energy resources. They must continue to pass reforms that will make private investment more lucrative, and thus more attractive, to hesitant energy companies – who have the capital and the expertise the region needed to develop their shale and deep-sea reserves, as well as their green energy.

Read more…


Advisers Take Long-Term View on Latin America

November 21, 2013

Latin_America2The Wall Street Journal, 11/21/2013

Even though Latin America has been a laggard among developing markets this year, some advisers are convinced the resource-rich region is poised for a turnaround.

But instead of investing once again in Brazil–the 800-pound gorilla in the group–contrarian portfolio managers are finding smaller markets in Mexico and Chile as better bets to tap into Latin America’s long-term growth.

Read more…


Brazil and Mexico, where political risk still rules

October 8, 2013

Expert Take

 The Financial Times, 10/07/2013

Guest Post by Larry Brainard of Trusted Sources 

On a two-week visit to Brazil and Mexico last month I had an opportunity to test claims that Mexico had leapfrogged Brazil as the most dynamic economy in Latin America. I found that political risk is still the key to each country’s prospects and that a simple answer to who is ahead of whom is unattainable.

In Brazil I found no shortage of pessimism about President Dilma Rousseff’s management of the economy, but I returned home more optimistic because the possibility that Dilma will fail to be re-elected next October is growing. In particular, political dynamics have been upset by the alliance between the environmentalist Marina Silva and Eduardo Campos, governor of Pernambuco state and the president of Brazil’s socialist party.

Read more…

 


Mexico swoons and Brazil rallies in response to US shutdown

October 8, 2013

Flag-Pins-Mexico-BrazilThe Christian Science Monitor, 10/07/2013

The US government shutdown is rippling across Latin America, seesawing regional economies as markets and analysts take toll of the immediate and long-term impacts from the crisis in Washington.

Mexico and Brazil, the two largest economies in Latin America, saw their currencies swing in opposite directions last week as the US inched closer to a default. The Mexican peso fell to a month-low on concerns over weakened US demand for Mexican goods, while the Brazilian real rallied on speculation that the shutdown would prolong the US Federal Reserve’s stimulus program that has pumped cheap dollars into emerging markets.

Read more…


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 10,051 other followers