Vetting Failed to Cull Mexican Cops Accused in Student Kidnappings

November 18, 2014

11/18/14 Bloomberg

federal police mexicoThe Mexican police who are accused of kidnapping 43 students in Guerrero state two months ago and handing them to a drug gang didn’t dodge the government’s vetting process. Most of the officers involved had cleared it. In Sonora, a state prison chief remains on the job three years after he failed his background check. And in Jalisco, a mayor said he wants to re-test officers found unfit to serve — because he can’t afford the severance payments if he fired them. The cases, across Mexico, shed light on how corruption in law enforcement has continued to fester under President Enrique Pena Nieto as he focused on economic improvements and an international image makeover for the country.

Read More… 


Apparent Mass Murder Of 43 Students Hurts Mexico’s Tourism

November 18, 2014

11/17/14 NPR

The economy in the Mexican state of Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped and found dead, is hurting. Tourists have stopped coming to that state and others.

Listen Here…


Mexico’s Holy Warrior Against the Cartels

November 18, 2014

11/18/14 The Daily Beast 

roadside crossIf you want to know about the Mexican priest Padre Gregorio López, first of all you need to know that his parish is located in the small city of Apatzingán, at the heart of a region in southern Mexico known as a fiefdom of the Knights Templar drug cartel. Then you need to know that he considers it his religious obligation to drive the cartel out of the city and out of the state of Michoacán. The lengths to which the padre is willing to go to achieve that end have carried his reputation far beyond the rough-and-tumble region known as Tierra Caliente, so named for an average annual temperature that rounds down to 95 degrees. Land theft, the extortion of farmers, and the rise in kidnappings and murders were grievances left to simmer for years in the countryside.

Read More… 


Alleged drug cartel kingpin extradited to U.S.

November 18, 2014

11/17/14 USA Today 

hands in handcuffsAn alleged leader of a major Mexican drug cartel, charged with smuggling tons of cocaine and methamphetamine into the U.S., made his first appearance in a U.S. courtroom Monday following his weekend extradition from Mexico. Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell said Alfredo Beltran Leyva and the Beltran Leyva Cartel distributed massive amounts of dangerous narcotics and “engaged in a campaign of violence that sparked drug wars and jeopardized public safety across North America.” Until his 2008 arrest, according to court documents, Beltran Leyva allegedly led the group with his brothers, Hector Beltran Leyva and Arturo Beltran Leyva. Arturo was killed in a 2009 shootout with the Mexican army.

Read More…


Protests rage over missing students in Mexico ahead of national strike

November 18, 2014

11/17/14 Aljazeera 

MIGUEL TOVAR / LATINCONTENT / GETTY

MIGUEL TOVAR / LATINCONTENT / GETTY

Protests over the disappearance of 43 missing students raged across Mexico and the United States over the weekend. Activists blamed a government they say has ties to organized crime and called for people in Mexico and the U.S. to support a Mexico-wide strike on Thursday. Coinciding with the Nov. 20 strike, protest marches will be held in Mexico City, as well as dozens of cities across the U.S. including New York City and Los Angeles. “We want to warn that these acts of protest will not be silenced while the civil and human rights of our Mexican brothers continue to be violated and trampled on by a government that has colluded with organized crime and to those who blamed the crimes committed by the state on [cartels] — thereby evading their own responsibility in the state sponsored genocide that has been committed with total impunity,” #YoSoy123NY, the New York chapter of a Mexican social movement that opposes Mexico’s current government, said in a statement handed out at a protest in New York City on Sunday.

Read More… 


Meth-lab busts down; dealers getting drug from Mexico

November 18, 2014

11/17/14 USA Today 

Meth_User_400x602Law-enforcement agencies across Tennessee are trumpeting a drop in meth lab busts, but their excitement is tempered by a cheaper, stronger version of the drug coming from the same Mexican drug cartels that bring heroin and cocaine. Methamphetamine lab busts and seizures are down 41% across the state, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. Other meth-heavy states such as Missouri and Oklahoma have seen similar trends this year.

Read More… 


Mexico’s Rule of Law Crisis

November 18, 2014

11/16/14 Wall Street Journal 

gun - crime sceneWhat do the September disappearance of 43 university students from the custody of local police in the state of Guerrero, Mexico, and new allegations of federal corruption in the awarding of public infrastructure contracts have in common? Answer: They both show that Mexico still has a huge problem enforcing the rule of law. The two developments have sparked a political crisis that could sink Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) President Enrique Peña Nieto ’s ambitious reform agenda if he doesn’t take quick and decisive action to restore confidence. Until now the president has been able to ignore Mexico’s legendary lawlessness. He has been riding an international wave of excitement around the opening of the energy sector, with few questions asked. But unless he wants to make common cause with the hard left—which thinks it has him on the ropes because of the missing students—he needs to admit his mistakes, purge his cabinet and make the rule of law job No. 1.

Read More… 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 10,631 other followers