Will Scandals In Mexico Dampen Investment?

November 25, 2014

11/25/14 Forbes

bridge with trafficThe past few months have been a difficult time for Mexico. In a recent article for the World Politics Review I explained, “Autumn has been a difficult season for Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto. Public furor has erupted into sustained and sometimes violent protests over the disappearance of 43 students in the rural southwestern state of Guerrero. Long one of Mexico’s poorest, most crime-ridden and isolated states, Guerrero had not been a priority for Pena Nieto’s administration, which has focused tirelessly on promoting the image of a modern and efficient Mexico to foreign investors.”  Although 2014 has marked a number of successful economic reforms and an uptick in economic growth, Mexico’s autumn has been sullied by scandals.

Read More…


Mexico’s Energy Reforms: A Progress Report

November 25, 2014

November 25, 2014 Wilson Center Now 

stock-footage-montage-of-clean-energy-fossil-fuel-pollutionMexico is attempting to turn one of the world’s most closed energy programs into one of its most open. Is transformational change possible? And if success is achieved, what are the implications for Mexico, its neighbors, and the world? Duncan Wood is an expert on energy issues and also serves as Director of the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute. He provides insight and analysis during this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

Read More… 


Publication: Fostering Innovation in Mexico

November 25, 2014

November 2014 Mexico Institute

By Duncan Wood, Christopher Wilson, Alejandro Garcia

Innovation2Mexicans are creative and entrepreneurial. Some of the world’s most notable and widely-used technologies have their roots in Mexico. Mexican chemist, Luis Miramontes, for instance, co-invented the progestin used in the first contraceptive pills. Mexican engineer, Guillermo González Camarena received the world’s first patent for the color television. And Mexican writer, Victor Celorio invented InstaBook, the technology that produces a perfect-bound book in one step and just two minutes. Mexico has a fine tradition of science and innovation, and President Enrique Peña Nieto is right to say, “Mexico should recognize, value, and take advantage of the great value of our human resources.” It is the Mexican entrepreneur that has been and will continue to be the strength of the nation’s economy and the driver of innovation.

To increase understanding of the benefits and challenges of innovation and to aid in the development of policy recommendations that encourage innovation in Mexico, the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars held a High-Level Innovation Forum for Policymakers in November 2013. The forum covered several topics related to innovation, including: entrepreneurship, financing innovative businesses, regulation, spillovers between universities and companies and the role of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Questions examined at the forum included: How has the global economy changed, and what does it mean for innovation? How should we be thinking about innovation? What conditions are necessary for innovation to thrive? How can we attract greater investment for innovation activities? What types of government policies and regulations can strengthen innovation? How can we better integrate science and technology into practical applications? What are the barriers to innovation, and how can we overcome them? This publication summarizes the main themes of the conference and highlights some lessons learned (the publication is available both in English and Spanish).

Read More…


Mexico’s Missing Students: Growing Demands for Answers and Justice

November 25, 2014

11/20/14 Wilson Center on Demand 

MIGUEL TOVAR / LATINCONTENT / GETTY

MIGUEL TOVAR / LATINCONTENT / GETTY

It’s been two months since the arrest and disappearance of a group of Mexican students, and anger and demands for answers and justice continues to grow. What does this tragic situation tell us about security in Mexico? And has government and law enforcement, at all levels, responded effectively? These are just some of the questions addressed by Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood during this episode of NOW.

Watch here: http://bit.ly/1r2swln


Billionaire Slim’s Workers Stage Walkout in Support of Students

November 20, 2014

11/20/14 Bloomberg 

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP - Getty Images

Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP – Getty Images

Employees of billionaire Carlos Slim’s telephone company plan to join relatives of 43 missing college students to protest the government’s response to the mass disappearance in Iguala, Mexico. The union at America Movil SAB (AMXL)’s Telmex landline unit will hold a 24-hour walkout and called on members to join demonstrators in Mexico City’s central square, union chief Francisco Hernandez said. The marches are scheduled for this afternoon. “We can’t turn our gaze away and pretend this doesn’t concern us,” Hernandez said in a video message to Telmex employees yesterday. “We have to look for solutions not just for the disappeared young people so that this tragedy never happens again, but also to lead this country on a path to have justice, to eradicate impunity and corruption.”

Read More… 


Special Report: Plant with troubled past at center of Takata air bag probe

November 20, 2014

11/20/14 Reuters 

REUTERS/Daniel Becerril/Files

REUTERS/Daniel Becerril/Files

The dusty, industrial town of Ciudad Frontera,Mexico, has moved from the far reaches of the global auto supply chain to the front lines of an investigation into why air bags from Takata Corp are blowing up with lethal force in accidents. The Takata plant there has been confirmed as the source of defective air bags made in 2001 and 2002 and again around 2012, according to recall records, automakers and regulators. In 2006, the factory blew up, driving home for workers and residents the volatility and risk of the explosive compound at the core of Takata’s air bags. Now, the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has ordered Tokyo-based Takata Corp (7312.T) to submit a wide array of records, including those pertaining to manufacturing controls at the Mexican plant, as part of an investigation into why its air bags have shot shrapnel at drivers in five fatal accidents from Oklahoma to Malaysia.

Read More… 


Take Mexico off the ‘safe list,’ immigration protesters urge

November 20, 2014

11/19/14 Leader Post

canada mexicoRaul Gatica Bautista fled Mexico for Canada in 2005 with a bullet wound in his stomach and scarring on his face, grim testaments to the abuse the indigenous rights activist says he suffered at the hands of the Mexican police. Canada accepted him as a refugee then, but Gatica Bautista says this country would turn him away today because of changes last year that placed Mexico on a list of 42 countries deemed safe by the federal government. Asylum seekers from these countries have fewer appeal options and are deported faster than refugee claimants from other countries. On Wednesday, Gatica-Bautista and groups of protesters in several cities called on the federal government to take Mexico off the so-called “safe list,” citing the recent disappearance and possible massacre of 43 teaching students in rural Mexico and the ongoing persecution of indigenous rights activists. The group No One is Illegal has launched a similar petition.

Read More… 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 10,671 other followers